Fairly weak Forces of Destiny

I watched Star Wars: Forces of Destiny this weekend, making me remarkably up-to-date for once on a Star Wars project that doesn’t involve a theatrical release. It’s a fun little concept, with one-off adventures focusing mostly on the heroic ladies of the Star Wars galaxy. The end result is a bit of a mixed bag.

I thought some episodes, particularly the ones involving Leia, were pretty engaging, but all in all they didn’t really show or tell anything vital. All style, no substance. It’s the nature of this micro-episode format, but I already have a more interesting point of comparison: Genndy Tartakovsky’s Star Wars: Clone Wars. Those super-short episodes still managed to have something substantial to say and were incredibly effective at packing in a lot even within bite-sized chunks. I suppose the comparison is not entirely fair, since Tartakovsky’s series had a long-form story being told across episodes, while Forces of Destiny is just a scattered collection of one-offs. But it does seem like the creators want the comparison to be made, with an animation style that apes the stylized visuals and minimalist animation of the preexisting property. Even here Forces of Destiny feels distinctly less than; the animation falls flat, more along the lines of an amateur Flash video than a true spiritual successor to Clone Wars, and many of the character models were just sort of ugly. I was especially unhappy with the smooshed-up look on Anakin Skywalker’s face.

In short, I wanted to like the show, and what I could like I did, but there was a lot that I was not a fan of. This is especially disappointing in contrast to the continually great Rebels. While I think it’s fantastic to give more screen time to women in genre fiction, including in Star Wars, I would point to Filoni’s work with The Clone Wars or Rebels, or the new movies coming out, or many of the new-canon books, as better examples. Women should be in the story to do things, not to simply highlight the fact that they are women; diversity should not be synonymous with tokenism.

My final concern is that while Star Wars has always been used to sell merchandising, Forces of Destiny appears to exist only as a catalyst for the resultant merchandising. Even the press release announcing the series premiere concludes as follows:

A new short will premiere online each day at 10 a.m. PT, culminating with their broadcast debut on Disney Channel, Sunday, July 9; books, apparel, bedding, and toys based on the series will arrive August 1

Maybe this concern is a little silly, given that Star Wars has always been commercial, but normally the franchise has been more than just a vehicle to sell stuff.

Oh, by the way, and as evidenced by my header image, IG-88 is briefly in the series, in “Bounty of Trouble.” IG-88 is shown to be…fairly incompetent here. Further support for my theory that the Empire bounty hunters are far from the best, just the closest and most desperate!

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