On The Front Lines: Extra Notes

In my review of Star Wars: On The Front Lines, I mostly talked about the narrative, but I really loved the art too. Writer Dan Wallace and artists Adrián Rodriguez, Thomas Wievegg, Aaron Riley, and Fares Maese (and of course the associated editorial/publishing team) produced an excellent product. The image at the top of this post is an example of some of that beautiful artwork; I’ll abstain from sharing any other images because you should check the book out for yourself.

If you haven’t looked through the book yet, though, you should probably stop reading here. While the book recounts major battles from the films and from The Clone Wars show, it does actually include a number of potential spoilers when it fleshes out additional details. And I want to talk about some of those details!

First, the level of diversity in these pages is great, with the focus on characters like Jedi Knight Bultar Swan, Jedi Master Mace Windu, Coruscant Home Fleet Commander Honor Salima (a woman of color and Republic officer who appears to have been invented for this book), Grand Moff Randd, and Resistance pilot Jess Pava. We also get a spotlight on a lot more aliens: Gungan General Ceel; separatists like Geonosian Archduke Poggle the Lesser, Kerkoiden General Whorm Loathsom, Techno Union Emir Wat Tambor, and cyborg General Grievous; Twi’lek freedom fighter Cham Syndulla and Twi’lek refugee Numa; Ewok chief Chirpa; Mon Cal Admirals Raddus and Ackbar; Sullustan smuggler Nien Nunb; Resistance pilot Ello Asty; and a new personal favorite of mine, Ranat commando Musmuris Reetgeet. With the addition of perspectives of droids and clones, this feels to me like a highlight of meaningful diversity in Star Wars, with diverse characters in diverse roles that don’t (to me, at least) come off as mere tokenism. This is truly a whole galaxy involved in war. Of course, there are plenty of perspectives from white characters, especially white men–and honestly, some of those perspectives are my favorite (I’ll touch on a couple examples later).

Okay, so the next thing I want to bring up is that it’s great to have Bultar Swan show up. Aside from her brief appearance in Episode II, I think this represents her first new canon appearance, and it confirms that she survived Geonosis! I’d like to see more stories with her. I’ve been somewhat fascinated by Bultar Swan ever since she showed up in the Wizards of the Coast Star Wars Roleplaying Game supplement, Power of the Jedi Sourcebook.

20171001_150537 Instead of just another background Jedi, she had a deeper story. I thought that was cool. Most of the alien Jedi in the Battle of Geonosis have gone on to have stories told about them. Not all of the humans have more than a name and likeness. I don’t think there were ever that many stories about Bultar Swan, but she’s basically a complete enigma in the new canon.

That’s all to say that the character remains rather intriguing to me because of the mysteriousness of her background. I’d enjoy seeing her explored more. The brief excerpt in On The Front Lines that is written from her perspective seems reflective of her older personality, but there’s plenty of room for this character to grow.

 

 

I liked the reexamination of more well-known characters, as well. For example: I’ve always had a soft spot for Rebel fighter ace and Rogue Squadron pilot Wedge Antilles, the man who survived both Death Stars, and reading the section in his perspective was brutal. Wedge reflects,

I survived the Battle of Yavin, and for a long time, a part of me wished I hadn’t.

. . .

When a laser blast from one of [the TIEs] melted my micromaneuvering controls, I was done. I couldn’t continue the run. I had to get out of the trench. If I had stayed, I would have fishtailed into Biggs and taken us both out.

I apologized over the comm and pulled out of the trench. For just a moment I felt my fear turn into relief. That’s the moment I always think about. That’s the moment that hardened into guilt.

Poor Wedge! What a real emotion, what a sincere experience in this fantasy galaxy. And I think it gives Wedge a clearly defined narrative arc in the films, one that would not otherwise be there (at least explicitly). Wedge keeps trying to make up for that moment, and maybe he finally does when he helps to take down the second Death Star. At least, I sure hope he found some peace of mind in doing so (here I am, talking about this fictional character like he’s a real person–what can I say, the writing here worked really well).

And Nien Nunb, who got to have more of an interesting story and personality in the new canon’s Princess Leia comic, has a pretty funny and sassy section in which he cheers the superiority of smugglers in the Rebellion.

One character revision that certainly stood out to me, though I didn’t necessarily like it, involves Hobbie Klivian (the image at the top is from this section). As you may know, in the novelization of The Empire Strikes Back, Hobbie is dying in a crippled snowspeeder and directs it into General Veers’s AT-AT, apparently killing them both. The novelization concludes the scene as follows, from the perspective of General Veers:

At that instant, Hobbie’s burning ship crashed through the walker cockpit like a manned bomb, its fuel igniting into a cascade of flame and debris. For a second there were human screams, then fragments, and the entire machine crashed to the ground.

This death scene does not appear in the film. It could not happen offscreen exactly as written, either. In the novelization, Hobbie appears to interrupt Veers’s attack on the shield generator. But in the film, Veers survives at least long enough to personally destroy the shield generator.

In the old canon, a version of the crash did occur. In this version, Hobbie and his gunner ejected in time, and he went on to become an important figure in the X-Wing franchise of comics and novels (confession: as beloved by fans as the series is, I never read the books and only saw maybe a couple issues of the comics). Veers, meanwhile, was left disabled by the attack, although he continued to serve in the military as well.

Hobbie’s kamikaze death has been restored–and there’s no way he got pulled from the wreckage this time. The first sentence of Hobbie’s section notes his “heroic death.”

What I’m worried about now is the fate of General Veers. Apparently Hobbie crashed into Blizzard One, the lead AT-AT, just as in the old canon. As I’ve previously mentioned, General Veers is my favorite Imperial of the films and one of the few Imperial officers who is actually competent. Dan Wallace recognizes this competence, writing of Veers that he was a “brilliant tactician” whom “Darth Vader respected . . . for his eerily calm demeanor under fire.” I saw nothing definitive about what happened to Veers in the book. It certainly seems likely that he is dead. But he could have survived, evacuating the AT-AT in time. Maybe he was badly injured in this new canon version and will once again return to active military service. I hope so. It’s always more interesting when the Rebellion actually has a challenging and recurring foe. And I suppose I don’t love the idea of Veers dying in a nearly identical way to Piett, killed by a damaged kamikaze craft when his forces are overextended.

At this point, I could go on and on, but I’ve covered the things that most fascinated me about the book (though I have to name-drop Musmuris Reetgeet again, because he’s a cool guy). It’s a great Star Wars reference book, and it’s also a lovely art book. I hope there are more guides like this released for the new canon!

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