A good weekend

This weekend was good because I was able to do very little that was in any way productive. That was quite fun. Most of the weekend was spent playing Zelda or reading. I played so much Zelda and could do another update just on that alone, but that would be productive, so I’m not doing it today. Let me point out that the image up top is recycled from my last post. What I will do is say that I’ve reached Goron City; I’ve completed the memory main quest, and I’m ready to knock out my last Divine Beast. Then I guess I need to get the Sword of Legend and, of course, wander around to solve mysteries and help people in distress until I’m finally willing to go face Ganon and give Zelda a much-deserved rest. She’s waited a hundred years; she can wait a little longer.

Relatedly, I’m pretty amused by the Switch profile’s game tracking. It’s pretty difficult to tell how vague the tracking is, or if there’s a cap to the number of hours it will report. Or maybe it wouldn’t be that difficult at all to figure this out, but I don’t check very often. Last I checked, which must have been a few weeks back, the profile indicated that I had played about 60 hours or more. Well, it’s continued to track a higher number, though it’s stayed just as vague:

27624735_10156221752181518_5526228664736980710_o.jpg

Wow, I’ve played a lot of Zelda. At least that seems like a lot to me!

Anyway, I said I’d spent the weekend gaming and reading. I’m currently reading UFOs: Generals, Pilots, and Government Officials Go on the Record, by Leslie Kean, and as I result of that, I watched I Know What I Saw, directed by James Fox; Kean and Fox worked together in interviewing witnesses and bringing a group of credible observers together for a conference in, I believe, 2011. The trigger for my current tangent into ufology is the reporting this winter on the Pentagon’s investigation into UFOs, reporting which involved Kean. As with all things ufological, there are a lot of interesting stories in this book and film, and some things truly seem unexplainable, but some of the narratives are sandpapered to remove the rough edges of factual inconsistencies and alternative explanations (conversely, in hearing accounts of some famous sightings by those who actually investigated, I’m shocked to realize how knee-jerk reactionary the debunking/skeptical community can be–I’d completely written off the 2006 O’Hare incident until reading this book). Still, the core of the book and film, that about 5% of UFO sightings cannot be explained via conventional means despite sufficient documentation to rule out all known technological and natural possibilities, and that these sightings are often made by trained observers including pilots and military personnel, and that the US should follow the example of other countries in conducting an open and honest investigation into the phenomenon, is valid and worth considering.

As a child, I had a fascination with a lot of paranormal nonsense like alien abductions and ghosts and various cryptids, as well as the associated conspiracy theories; I think growing out of that and becoming skeptical really helped improve my critical thinking skills. But I’ve always had a soft spot for the paranormal, and while Kean and Fox can’t say that UFOs are anything other than unexplained and currently unexplainable aerial phenomena, that’s still interesting and remarkable in and of itself. (Too bad Fox’s movie was distributed by the very absurdly named UFO TV.)

All right, back to being unproductive.

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