Christopher Robin

I didn’t really intend to watch Christopher Robin. I don’t have kids, and I don’t have much patience for Disney’s endless parade of live-action remakes of animated films (making a worse product, but selling it as “more mature,” and relying on nostalgic imagery in trailers, is some of the most disgustingly crass marketing to Millenials I’ve seen–and I played the Let’s Go, Pikachu! game for dozens of hours, so I know Millenial pandering when I see it).

Netflix kept promoting it, though, and I decided to just put it on in the background while my wife would be out, and almost immediately I became deeply enthralled by and enraptured with it.

It’s not a perfect movie, but it’s so easy to look past the imperfections when there is so much whimsy and charm and heart. And it’s important to note that it’s not a remake but a reinterpetation and continuation of Winnie the Pooh. In that regard, the film is rather like Hook, a film with its own original story that served as a sequel to Peter Pan. In fact, the films have similar narratives and themes, as key figures of classic children’s literature, who have since become world-weary, unhappy, middle-aged men, rediscover childhood wonder and fun just in time to reaffirm what is truly valuable in life and to reconnect with family. I liked Hook as a child, and I find that I liked Christopher Robin even more as an adult. But I know that Hook didn’t have the most positive reception, and I suspect that Christopher Robin is also a movie where appreciation will hinge especially on subjective, emotional responses, and receptivity could vary widely.

As a child, I loved the Milne stories and the animated Pooh as voiced by Jim Cummings. So while I never thought I’d watch a movie like this as an adult, while I saw it as a suspect addition to the live-action remake trend, it did not take much for me to fall overwhelmingly in love. And with an excellent cast spearheaded by Ewan McGregor and the voice talents of Cummings, the emotional soul of the movie is palpable. Let’s just say, I cried many times and for many reasons while watching this movie.

Christopher Robin was a movie tailored to my demographic, and it resonated with me, and it had a universal message with enough emotional weight to say something about my own life and about growing up and adulthood. I might add this to the rotation of films I return to, especially when I’m going through a hard time. Discovering this film this week meant a lot to me.

It’s fine by me if you can’t buy into it, if you see the film itself as a cheap appeal to Millenials and their pocketbooks. But anyone with a little of their child-self left, or anyone with children of their own, should hopefully find room to be touched by this charming little movie about a charming little bear and his best friend.

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