War Criminals: The Mandalorian 1.1

I watched the first episode of The Mandalorian last night, and I’m finding that my opinion seems to conform to a pretty common set of reactions. I thought it captured the atmosphere of certain elements of the nineties Expanded Universe, for better and worse. I enjoyed watching an episode of television that was less than an hour in length, though I felt like it dragged on a bit, meaning I suppose that the show was effectively contained to a narrow time limit but wasn’t economical with its storytelling within that time. At the end of the episode, it felt like a fun adventure, but I also had very little idea of the characters or the overarching plot. The surprise revelation at the end truly was surprising, and it raises a lot of questions, but it has me more baffled than excited.

But after so recently re-reading Tales of the Bounty Hunters, I’m in the mood for more of The Mandalorian. I’m certainly willing to stick with it for at least a few more episodes to see where it goes and what it’s trying to do (then again, there are only eight episodes in the first season, so it’d be easy enough to watch it all).

If there’s something that stands out to me so far, besides the old Legends callbacks, it’s the setting. Set five years after the fall of the Empire, we’re in a time period that’s relatively unexplored within the new continuity. There are certainly echoes of the Imperial Remnant’s splinter factions and warlords from the old Expanded Universe, but I was especially intrigued by how much the show seemed to be reflecting narratives about the post-World War II era. I get that people are amused by the absurdity of a Serious Auteur like Werner Herzog delivering lines about Mandalorian beskar (and forgive me, but I can’t claim to have even the slightest familiarity with his oeuvre), though I instead found it striking to see an older gentleman with a German accent, draped in an ornamental costume and wearing a flashy medallion from his fallen Empire, negotiating for an illicit operation to abduct or kill a target with the promise of payment in ingots of a rare metal collected from a people subjected to a purge by his former military authorities. The Galactic Empire has always relied on a visual language that evokes Space Nazis, but there has been a gradual ramping up in the obviousness of that imagery over time. The First Order is draped in Nazi-esque fascist iconography, and it’s a common observation that the movement of Hux and Kylo Ren feels more than a little like the real-world resurgence of far-right movements across the globe. In The Mandalorian, the Imperial holdouts we’ve seen so far are like Nazi war criminals in hiding in the decades following the end of the war. This progression from aggressive fascist empire to scattered war criminals operating underground to a seething resurgence maps up with real-world developments all too well.

I wonder if this theme will tie in more directly to the developing plot. For now, anything else is pure speculation.

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