Two Samurai: The Mandalorian 1.4

In this episode, our intrepid bounty hunter attempts to find safe haven for his young ward, leading him to accept a job protecting a small farming village in exchange for lodging. It doesn’t work out as planned.

The Mandalorian seems like a man hungry for connection. He didn’t seem to quite fit in with his fellow Mandalorians, even though they aided him in the end. (It turns out that he’s adopted into the clan.) He was betrayed by his fellow bounty hunters–or I guess you could say he betrayed them by breaking the rules of the guild, but he saved a small child from torture and death, and they were motivated by greed in hunting him down, so it’s clear to me that they wronged him and not the other way around. But he was so quick to find a connection with the kid, and with Kuiil, and now with Cara Dune and the capable widow of the farming village (do we ever learn her name? I didn’t catch it). We learn that the Mandalorians gave him a community and a family when he had none, taking him in after the death of his parents, but the burden to remain separate and apart from others, to always keep his armor on and to never reveal his face, weighs heavily on him. Perhaps he was just too old to become a good Mandalorian, just like Anakin was too old to become a good Jedi, but it seems like he is increasingly wearied by those cultural obligations.

The structure of the episode’s main plot pulls heavily from the Samurai/Western roots of Star Wars, serving up a variant of the plot seen in Seven Samurai and The Magnificent Seven and, more recently, the “Bounty Hunters” episode of Star Wars: The Clone Wars. The structure is obvious, but the episode keeps its focus largely on the Mandalorian and his foster child; the adventure protecting the farmers is just one step in their journey, as the Mandalorian considers finding a safe place for at least one of them.

Another influence appears to be Ewoks: The Battle for Endor. The pirate raiders who live in the woods have a general aesthetic and purpose that appears to be half-Marauder, half-orc. The planet inhabited by the farmers and raiders, with its temperate forests and calm waterways, evokes Endor. Even the farmers’ residences are at least slightly reminiscent of concept art for the Ewok abodes in Return of the Jedi.

The raiders in the episode appear to be Klatooinian, but it’s hard for me to shake the impression of visual and thematic connectivity to that old Ewok movie.

We’re now halfway through this season, and I’m beginning to wonder if we ever will get bigger answers about just who and what Baby Yoda is. It’s seeming increasingly unimportant to the story being told here, where Baby Yoda is part MacGuffin and part softening agent for the protagonist. I could easily see the next four episodes telling a story of continued flight before the Mandalorian finally tries to take the fight to those who want this child so badly.

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