Review: Disenchantment Part Two

The second season of Disenchantment introduces some new characters and settings, but it ultimately fails to disrupt the aimless wandering from the first season, and its first three episodes neatly resolve the massive changes to the world and the main characters left by the previous season’s cliffhanger ending, restoring the status quo for another round. That means that we have five episodes of Princess Bean, her boorish king and father, and her best friends Elfo the elf and Luci the demon getting up to more reckless antics.

I enjoyed watching most of the season, though I never had a burning desire to continue it. It still rested on a lot of excessive violence and gross-out humor, but I found that I cared a little more about the characters, as they had all softened somewhat. We saw this in Luci by the end of the first season, but he continues to grow and humanize, and while he still talks a big demonic game, he’s largely turned his back on the role of supernatural villain (even making some significant sacrifices for his friends), settling comfortably into the identity of sassy talking cat bartender (yes, that string of words does quickly make sense within the context of the show). Bean was deeply affected by the resolution of season one, and while she is still without a larger purpose, she seems more sentimental and slightly less selfish (though her royal upbringing results in an entitlement and self-absorption that she’s still not fully aware of and that often gets used for laughs). Bean’s relationship with her family is further complicated, and she finds more value and connection with some of her family members. Funny enough, Elfo, returning from death itself, has become slightly more hardened and jaded, though he and his elf friends are still a regular source of sweet naivete.

The season goes to some fun new locations, including an occult, Egyptian-influenced desert empire and a steampunk realm. But it still lacks a sense of direction–which the show acknowledges, as it is always willing to do with its flaws. Bean says in the last episode, “While I was growing up, I was completely lost, and then after I met you guys I was still lost, but at least we got lost together.” This sentimental moment is quickly followed by another cliffhanger ending that I’m sure just about everyone will see coming (though the particular details of its occurrence are still wild), setting up yet another season. Now I’m not so confident that the show will ever truly grow beyond what it is, but I’m enjoying what that is a little more now. Even if we only get incremental development of the characters and plot, I’ll probably keep watching. Still, for Part Two, I can safely suggest skipping the middle episodes. I previously recommended watching the first and final three episodes of season one. For season two, another ten-episode affair, you could easily get away with watching the first three and the last two.

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