Review: Sasquatch (2021)

Sasquatch is a moody, unnerving documentary on Hulu that has very little to do with Bigfoot at all, and I’m here to recommend it. The three-part series follows investigative journalist David Holthouse as he pursues a story based on a wild conversation overheard on a weed farm in 1993: allegedly, a couple of guys working for a weed farmer in the Emerald Triangle of California stumbled on the aftermath of a Sasquatch massacre in which three men were killed. Of course, that’s not the real story, and decades later, Holthouse tries to find out what actually happened. He never finds a certain answer, but he does produce a couple likely options, including a version of events that, while still rather far-fetched, probably represents something like the truth.

The first episode does spend time with the Bigfoot myth, interviewing local Bigfoot hunters to lay some groundwork for the bizarre and obscure rumor of the Sasquatch triple homicide. But the narrative quickly settles in the dark underbelly of the black market cannabis trade in California, finding its home in paranoid Back to Landers, violent Hells Angels, unreliable tweakers, quick-to-vanish migrant workers, and other oddballs and outcasts. All of this is intermixed with hauntingly beautiful footage of the northern California forests, with their moody contrasts of dark and light beneath old growth canopies. Here is a land where anything could, and apparently does, happen.

The myth of Bigfoot and the rumors traded within this uneasy community of weed growers become intertwined as the miniseries progresses, and Bigfoot returns to prominence as a figure of myth toward the very end to be juxtaposed with the monsters and contemporary myths that Holthouse has encountered. All are surreal and frightening conjurations of the outsider. The nuanced intermingling of myth and reality at the end offers a fascinatingly complex bit of philosophical musing to cap the show off. But Holthouse remains grounded and down to earth throughout.

Anyone who’s a fan of true crime or has an interest in obscure, even seemingly alien, alternative cultures should give this docuseries a viewing. It’s sort of the anti-Tiger King, focused on another bizarre, drug-fueled, self-absorbed, and ruthless counter-culture operating at best in the gray areas of the law, but without the mockery of its principal subjects that last year’s social media darling show delighted in. Sasquatch humanizes even as it shows us the monsters who live just outside of our view.

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