Blue’s Story

Jurassic World portrays the Velociraptors as very intelligent, feral animals that can nonetheless be trained, at least to a certain degree. Owen’s pack appears to bounce around in loyalty dependent on the situation, and there’s the constant tension from the beginning that they’re always a moment away from turning on and killing their human alpha. It makes sense that the raptors would be trainable but unreliable. You could expect the same from a “trained” wolf or tiger or bear. And the raptors are super-smart predators from another era.

Still, Fallen Kingdom relies on the audience to root for and trust Blue throughout virtually the whole movie. She’s the Good Dinosaur, if you will. And we’re shown early on in this movie that Blue is actually special in a number of ways, not just smarter than the other raptors but more empathetic. She and Owen have a very special bond.

At first, Fallen Kingdom seems to reverse on the depiction of the raptors from the predecessor film, making Blue, at least, a friendlier killer. But while I’ll admit that it’s at least somewhat of a retcon, I don’t think that the movies are actually in contradiction. Fallen Kingdom invites a different read, in which Blue has been a hero the whole time, a consistently loyal girl to her sisters and her human dad.

It must be acknowledged that this view of Blue is not shared by Owen himself. Owen clearly respects the raptors, but he is also clearly aware that they might kill him given the chance. And that’s undeniable; riled up enough, they probably would kill Owen and move on. But these raptors don’t have any reason to understand just how much weaker humans are; humans always seem in control of the situation, literally above them all, wielding treats and correction from a remove. They could easily kill Owen, but I suspect that were it to happen, it would be an accident. The raptors regularly jostle for rank, it would seem, and what could be an acceptable clash between sisters could be lethal if applied toward a human.

When we first meet the raptors, they’re responding to Owen’s commands (if perhaps a bit reluctantly). We are to understand that this has been a long journey to get them to respond promptly and correctly. But Fallen Kingdom also lets us know that the other raptors are going to be more problematic, that they don’t have the same level of empathy, the same ability for cross-species connection, that Blue has. Blue is the bridge between the worlds. Even Jurassic World doesn’t suggest that they’d kill for no reason. The antics with the pig and the keeper are the result of human negligence; it’s natural that the raptors, instinctively viewing the little fleeing piglet as prey, would be desirous of it, and it’s also natural that they might react with hostility toward a human suddenly and unwantedly dropped into their territory, a human interfering with their pig hunt, a human they have no connection to. They’d definitely kill that keeper; I’m not so sure, however, that they’d have lunged for Owen if he hadn’t rolled away. In fact, it’s not just the roll but his movement to face away from them that seems to trigger them. If they’d wanted to, they could have easily taken him down in the moment, but they were at least tenuously reactive to his commands.

After that, Blue doesn’t ever act aggressively toward Owen. In fact, none of the raptors seem to act aggressively toward their alpha. When deployed on the chase for the Indominus, they’re perfectly content to hunt down their target, running alongside Owen as an integrated pack. Sure, they’re caught off guard by the Indominus; they’d have no reason to expect that it could communicate with them. And it’s certainly big enough to be a real threat! When I first watched this scene, I saw the moment in which all their camera views are trained on Owen as a sign that they’d turned on him, that they were about to attack. Owen certainly believes they’d found a new alpha (after, it should be mentioned, the raptors would have reason to feel betrayed by being fired on). But again, in context of the softer view of at least Blue in Fallen Kingdom, it’s just as reasonable to see that moment as the raptors turning back to Owen for input about how to proceed. Because Owen doesn’t fully trust his pack and can’t intuit their thinking, he perceives it as a threat. But wouldn’t a loyal pack look to their leader, waiting patiently for his cue before proceeding? It’s only when the mercenaries start firing that they turn on the humans–and even then, they target the other humans, not Owen. Owen had warned early in the movie, in that pig-keeper scene, that if the raptors were fired on, they’d “never trust me again.”

Even in the ensuing chaos, there are signs of raptor loyalty. Charlie and Owen made eye contact during the fight, and even though she’d just killed another man, she didn’t react aggressively. She cocked her head, acted curious. She seemed to be awaiting input yet again, only to be killed by a rocket explosion a moment later. Similarly, Owen was able to get Blue to leave Barry alone by whistling for her; it’s as easy to say that she followed him because he was the leader as to say it was because she was hunting him instead. Later, Delta might even have attacked Hoskins because she recognizes him as a bad guy and a threat to both Owen and her pack.

It’s true that the raptors pursue Owen’s party and corner them, but why wouldn’t they? Owen’s their leader, and they’re trained to form up on him. Rather than attack, Blue lets him remove the camera halter. The raptors once more communicate with Indominus and look to Owen for input, which he’s able to actually signal this time. Frustrated by the raptors’ lack of compliance, the Indominus attacks Blue, making the ensuing fight deeply personal for Delta and Echo. The raptors fight for their sisters and their dad to the very end in this final battle. After the fight, lone raptor survivor Blue looks first to the Tyrannosaurus and then to Owen to determine what to do. Subtly warned away by Owen and apparently perceiving that she no longer has a place or a pack, she leaves without any aggression toward Owen or his companions.

Fallen Kingdom‘s additional details about Blue don’t have to undermine or contradict anything that came before. And once more in Fallen Kingdom, Blue feels fiercely loyal to her human dad and his human pack, though once more she ultimately chooses to go off on her own when all the threats have passed, seemingly recognizing that she’ll never fit in without her own raptor companions. She stays long enough to make sure Owen is okay, and then she leaves, choosing a life of isolation and freedom over companionship and imprisonment.

Blue is a loyal hero with a tragic arc. This is largely true for her antihero raptor sisters, as well. Both of the Jurassic World films ultimately support this read, especially when viewed together. And Blue deserves the interpretation!

2 thoughts on “Blue’s Story

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