Big ideas in Battle at Big Rock

I really rather liked Battle at Big Rock. It’s a high-concept short film with a very close focus on how just one family is impacted by this new world of dinosaurs coexisting with the modern era. The dinosaurs look great, and the terrified family has enough characterization to really root for them. I would love a lot of little films like this, just showcasing the new reality of that dinosaur-infused world.

Maybe more than the core story itself, the ending vignettes really showcase the big and small ways that the world has changed. That’s where I think the magic really lies with Big Rock. It’s not just the dramatic, life-or-death struggle between humans and big theropods, but seeing dinosaurs as harmless pests, traffic hazards, beautiful wildlife to see when out fishing or camping, invasive species, and so on. Those quieter moments set up interesting questions, prompt fun ideas, and provide a variety of new narrative possibilities. Outside of movies, I could see a variety of storytelling initiatives that all end up under the Jurassic World umbrella.

It’s not exactly comparable to Xenozoic because in that world, the neo-prehistoric life has overwhelmed the natural order in the wake of apocalypse (and that life comes from a much broader range of geologic ages). But still, the idea of a whole world of stories of humans just interacting with these long-lost lifeforms creates the same sort of tingling up and down my spine. It’s an exhilarating concept!

Jurassic World Evolution 2 seems like it’s going to play with this concept of a world adjusting to live with dinosaurs. For instance, in a fairly early forum post, Frontier Senior Community Manager Jens Erik wrote, “Certain modes allow you to transport live dinosaurs into your park from the wild via remote capture and narrative events and in some levels, they’ll be wild dinosaurs in your surrounding area that you need to locate, tranquilise and transport back to your facilities.” That same post discussed how the game would have dinosaurs forming natural territories in their exhibits. Rather than the deluxe destination resorts of Jurassic World Evolution (or the first and fourth movies), this seems more like an effort at conservation and containment among us, not apart from us. But not all stories need to be so big as a story about conservation park-building.

More Big Rock-style encounters with dinosaurs, even quiet moments, even subtle moments, could make for fun stories. I could imagine:

  • A group of biologists and paleontologists study a community of dinosaurs in northern California, seeing whether they’re thriving in their new environment and how the native plants and animals are handling the new arrivals;
  • A Jaws-type adventure as a whaling vessel attempts to hunt down the mosasaur;
  • A group of children befriend a peaceful baby Apatosaurus that becomes a bit of a handful as it continues to grow bigger and bigger;
  • Animal control struggles to keep a compy problem in check in a small city; or
  • Scientists for a rogue state or terrorist organization have bought or engineered some predators that predictably get loose and munch on their overlords.

And I’m still thinking too narrowly, along the lines of movies I’ve seen before. You could do whatever you wanted with the premise of dinosaurs just being out in the wild now. The “big idea” from Big Rock is the promise that you can have any sort of humans-and-dinosaurs story now, that it doesn’t have to be defined by a single genre and doesn’t even have to look like a Jurassic Park movie. I’m sure I’ve said it before a time or two on this blog, and I’ll probably say it a time or two again. But this promise continues to excite me! I hope it gets realized, in more short films, books, comics, and things that don’t really look anything like what the franchise has been so far.

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