The Mandalorian Season 2 Finale

[Warning: plenty of spoilers for The Mandalorian.]

I really rather enjoyed the finale of the second season of The Mandalorian. It was action-packed, it had some great tense sequences in which I was really dreading what would happen and entirely unsure of how it could be resolved, and then the ending was so bittersweet and hopeful, delivering some quiet character development. I thought it was a good cap to the season and, for that matter, to the overall story arc of the first couple of seasons, even while being a clear signal that future content is on the horizon.

Of course future content is on the horizon. Ten Star Wars series and a couple movies planned for the near future? That’s too much Star Wars! I’m not even keeping up on the books, and I gave up a couple years back on even trying to track the ever-increasing glut of comics being released for the new canon. Mixed feelings as usual here about this development: (1) more Star Wars gives more opportunities for new creators to dabble in the universe, for new stories to hook new fans, and for plenty of different characters and settings and subgenres so that everyone can probably find something they’ll like; (2) more Star Wars means that it will soon be unmanageable for most people to get a good footing in the universe, especially as it’s leaned more into MCU-esque winks for hardcore fans, like including Maul in Solo or Ahsoka in The Mandalorian, which at some point will surely begin to alienate people not already obsessed; (3) more Star Wars means I’ll have plenty to read and watch in my preferred sci-fi/fantasy setting, which is great, but it’s not so great to have me so insularly focused on one massive franchise when so much great independent sci-fi and fantasy has been and continues to be published; (4) more Star Wars means more talented writers writing for an existing property instead of exploring their own ideas, while also meaning that Star Wars becomes less of a thing defined by George Lucas’s vision and more of a bland product produced by committee; and (5) more Star Wars means that a monolithic corporation within the ever-narrowing band of oligarchic entertainment companies is going to tighten its grip even further by giving plenty of people reason to only watch/read/play/listen to (and thus pay for) its particular intellectual property, IP that in this case it just went out and bought after the fact rather than having any role in creating (as though IP law wasn’t already so corrupted toward longstanding corporate interests).

But enough of that. I actually just wanted to yell about Luke and Boba Fett.

Boba’s interactions with the “real” Mandalorians in the finale were fascinating. It’s easy to see why he remained such an isolationist outsider throughout his life, as he faced bigotry as a clone and a refusal by purists to accept him as a member of Mandalorian culture. Bo-Katan’s hostility toward his use of Mandalorian armor, despite his rightful claim to it, is somewhat ironic given her own wariness toward the extremist sect that Din belongs to. It’s interesting to see a lot of different Mandalorians in this diaspora all finding ways to identify themselves as “real” Mandalorians in the wake of the loss of their homeland, often creating identities in opposition to other ideas about what a Mandalorian can be. All that aside, that post-credits scene was some sweet Boba- and Fennec-badassery, and I am intrigued to see what The Book of Boba Fett does to further develop these characters. There are certainly plenty of subjects to explore. Why did Fett want his armor back now, and why did he not reclaim it earlier? Why was it important to him to claim Jabba’s palace? Does he plan to start his own criminal empire, or a new bounty hunter’s guild? Does he plot to build a coalition to retake Mandalore and rise as its ruler? Or perhaps does he want to assemble a warrior society of his own, an outsider group that rejects the formalistic traditions of Mandalorian culture? And now that he’s more of a team player and working with others, does he make any attempt to reconcile with the “friends” and mentors he’s had in the past, like Bossk or Dengar? I’ve never been great at speculation, so who knows if the story even follows any of those leads, but I’ll be interested to see what they do. Boba’s still not my favorite character, but I like this take on an honor-bound, brutal warrior who seems to be doing a tightrope walk of reflecting on and honoring his father’s heritage while facing and accepting rejection from the culture his father was raised in.

Then there’s Luke. It’s incredible that they really brought Luke into the show as the Jedi to respond to Grogu’s call. It was also incredible fan service to finally show Luke at the height of his powers, easy dismantling a platoon of super-soldier droids after we’d seen a single one of these Dark Troopers nearly pummel Din to death. I haven’t particularly been interested in the Disney Gallery series for The Mandalorian, but I’d love to see some behind-the-scenes discussion of how they got Mark Hamill’s younger voice and likeness spot-on for his appearance. Obviously most of the time, he was silent and hooded, and it’s not hard to figure out that you’d have a stunt double in any sort of sequence like that, but we have some extended periods where Luke is interacting with the Mandalorian posse.

Will we see more of this younger Luke? Will we finally see him starting his own Jedi Academy? I’d love to get more of that story. It’ll be interesting to see where Grogu goes; I suspect that, like Ahsoka, the little guy will find a way to escape the upcoming Jedi Purge (just as he did the original, come to think of it). And, though this is somewhat surprising to me, I’m really eager to see not just what comes of the potential conflict between Din and Bo-Katan, but also what exactly Boba Fett is up to.

Terra Nova deserves a fresh start

Every now and then, I think to myself that it would be nice to see Terra Nova returned or rebooted. You might not remember, or even heard of, Terra Nova. It existed for a brief while in 2011. I remember quite a lot of buzz for the expensive production, time-traveling shenanigans in the plot, dinosaurs, and involvement of Steven Spielberg as executive producer and Stephen Lang in a role that was basically a more mysterious, less evil version of his character in Avatar. Despite that, it became a convoluted mess that was cancelled after a single season, after a total of 13 episodes.

The basic premise was cool: humanity now lives in a worsening environmental apocalypse of its own making, but a new hope arises when scientists discover a way to travel into an alternative past corresponding to the Cretaceous Period. As far as anyone knows, you can go back, but you’re stuck there. They’ve been able to verify that activity in this other time stream does not affect the present, so there are no A Sound of Thunder ramifications to worry about. Humanity has a second chance at a future by going to a past that preexisted us. There are a variety of ecological threats to worry about from the native flora and fauna, but there’s just as much tension in the conflict between the cult-like loyalists to Lang’s militaristic compound leader and the rebel cell that splintered off from the main group and disappeared into the jungles.

What great potential! (And one utilized elsewhere since as an RPG setting.) Unfortunately, the show tried to be something for everyone. While the above would have been more than enough for several seasons of television, elements of different genres were cobbled together to try to catch as many eyes as possible from the start. The central viewpoint characters are a family escaping from the future to live a life free from its population-control laws (mom and dad had a third child). The hot-head father becomes top lawman to the colony leader. The mother is a doctor much needed by the community. The three kids, ranging from teens to a plucky young child, have their own assorted adventures. Focus could shift episode to episode, and even within a single episode you might have teen relationship angst intermingled with a prehistoric murder investigation. The two-parter first episode jumps between the complicated politics of the future and the past, the awe-inspiring nature of the prehistoric world, and some bizarrely low-budget teen slasher horror (literally, the dromaeosaurs in the show are called “slashers”). Within this oh-so-short first season, we even have a former love interest to come between the mother and father (never mind that they love each other so much, they staged an elaborate escape into the past just to preserve their nuclear family). On top of this, the conflict between the colony and its rogue faction is played up for maximum mystery, creating a more convoluted and opaque interrelationship than necessary and setting up a bizarre situation in which the officially sanctioned colony represents more of an isolationist, eco-friendly group while the rebels are actually working for the corporate interests controlling access to the time stream.

I haven’t watched the show in years because I know its flaws too well. Jumbled plot and mismanaged tones aside, it manages to look like over-produced yet still unconvincing television. The dinosaurs in particular look like obvious digital inserts, easily topped by the computer graphics, animatronics, and puppets used to bring Jurassic Park to life 18 years before this show. The dialogue and some of the performances could be just as unbelievable. Even if you can sit through it, you’ll be disappointed with an ending that sets up even more mysteries and leaves plenty of loose ends to never be resolved.

But, again, that premise is incredible! I’d love to see a show that doubles down on the premise, that focuses on a colony eking out a frontier existence in a world it should never have been a part of. The combination of post-apocalyptic politicking, prehistoric creatures, and environmental themes provides storytelling favorably comparable to Xenozoic. And the parallel-time-stream-traveling offers a unique explanation for how humans and dinosaurs could coexist, outside of the cloning route of Jurassic Park or the techno-magic implications of Xenozoic or The Dinosaur Lords.

If I were given the choice to continue or reboot Terra Nova, I think I’d do a prequel-as-reboot by focusing on the second generation of colonists to arrive. The colony is barely established, so there’s plenty of work still to be done in getting things running smoothly, but we have an outsider’s perspective to follow among the new arrivals, an outsider who finds this functioning community so devoted to the mythic figure of a former military man who managed to survive by himself for months before anyone else arrived. I wouldn’t mind a family focus at the center, but no bloated backstory. And if you go the family route, I’d rather the family actually be bonded so that they want to support each other and we have people to clearly root for. Teens will be teens, but the level of unnecessary drama combined with bad dialogue made it difficult to care about the cast of characters. By having the story start in the early days of the colony, we don’t have any rebel cell or mystery corporate interests; the central drama would simply be dealing with this totally alien world. You could bring in tension as later arrivers gradually grow resentful of the iron fist of the compound leader. That in and of itself is enough of a reason for a faction to revolt, without shady corporate tactics involved. I think a more interesting divide would be between those who believe they have the right to continue this colony and others who come to believe that this is still unnecessarily exploitative, with humanity following a path that will eventually doom this world too; perhaps they want to destroy any presence of a colony at all, or perhaps they want a way to teleport everyone back to the future and to shut down the time stream for good. Terra Nova dabbled with the idea that maybe our protagonists were working for the bad guy, but it eventually backed away from this, doubling down on the idea that the rebels were dishonest and basically evil. I’d push the cast-aside idea further; it’s not that the leader is evil, but he enjoys the control he has, and he has a settler mentality, intent on exploiting this world even without a clear corporate beneficiary.

Sure, if you could get past the rebooted season, you could layer on additional plot points. You could tell adventure and exploration stories, war stories, time travel stories, stories of corporate greed. You could have plenty of interesting real and speculative prehistoric plants and animals. You could run in a variety of directions, even time jump to set up a society that is more entrenched, to follow different characters. Heck, you could evolve from a rough-and-tumble frontier to a sprawling metropolis at the center of linked communities, complete with Dinotopia-style human-dinosaur symbiosis. But if you try to do too much too early, you don’t have likeable characters, and you keep throwing on more elaborate and unnecessary mysteries, you’re going to tank any show. Terra Nova already proved that. I wish that the premise had another chance, though.

Mando 2.2-2.3

I don’t think I’m going to do episode-by-episode reactions for this season of The Mandalorian, but I’m loving the new season so far. The newly introduced characters are fun (especially Frog Lady), and I was stoked to see the returning characters from other Mandalorian-themed Star Wars projects. I’m super-eager to see the character now sure to enter the series by the end of this season after a name drop in Chapter 11, and I like the tight focus on a clear quest that this season has, with a concrete end goal for Din Djarin.

I’m finding that my reactions so far are reinforced by larger fan chatter, so I just don’t feel especially compelled to post a reaction each time that’s in line with what everyone else is more or less saying. The big topic right now still seems to be the egg-eating from Chapter 10. For what it’s worth, I thought it was darkly humorous but also quite troubling, as even unfertilized, they were still the spawn of a sentient species. (While I think diverse writers’ rooms are important, I’m a little confused that this is being used as an example of the problems of an all-male writers’ room because I don’t think sensitivity about fertility/reproduction or violence against fellow sentient beings is something unique to non-cis/hetero men–after all, while I know this sounds like “not all men,” I still have to point out that these are issues I tend to be sensitive about!) Chapter 11 gives the Child the opportunity to gain a little bit of a new perspective, not only literally getting consumed like an egg in a terrifying moment of danger but also spending some pleasant quality time with the Frog Family and their new tadpole. I thought that latter element was sweet, redemptive, and a good opportunity for the kiddo to gain some needed empathy to contrast with all the violence Din regularly exposes them to.

I imagine this is another topic already heavily covered, but I am also glad to see the show finally acknowledge and explain the rift in Mandalorian cultures that has produced such an extremist sect with its fundamentalist values. The comparison to the development of real-world religious extremism among oppressed and marginalized minority groups is obvious. It’s kind of funny to me that Din was so deeply taken in by this cult and isolated from alternative worldviews that he didn’t even realize he was in an extremist cult, or that there were other sorts of Mandalorians! We’ve already seen moments in which he clearly wrestled with the hardline code of the Watch, and I wouldn’t be surprised to see him remove his helmet by the end of this season. Conveniently, Din’s involvement in what amounts to a hardcore cult in backwater systems of the Outer Rim also explains why he’s relatively ignorant about the Jedi, a religious order that is all-too-familiar to the more mainstream Mandalorians.

That’s all I have to say for now. But if I find something else I’d like to discuss in future episodes, you can bet I’ll share it!

The Mandalorian Returns: 2.1

Okay, yes, no “post” this “weekend” but I’d been so caught up with work and the conference that I’d forgotten The Mandalorian Season 2 started today and now I’ve watched the first episode and I’m all excited.

Good start. Good score. Good cinematography. Lots of good tension-building and quite a good bit of levity. Good Baby Yoda. Good balance of new and returning characters (I love the return of Amy Sedaris’s character).

Most of the rest of the stuff I loved consists of spoilers. So I guess watch the episode first? I just want to holler about it, real quick.

I am impressed and a little surprised that they actually kept the Cobb Vanth story from the Aftermath books. Maybe that’d been confirmed before the new season’s airing, but I haven’t been paying attention. And it’s not exactly the same Cobb Vanth that we see from Aftermath. The story’s a little different. Two tellings, two different versions. Is the version presented in Aftermath the “truer” version, or is Cobb’s story to Din Djarin as told in flashbacks in this episode the right one? It doesn’t really matter. (Wookieepedia, true to form, attempts to force together a single narrative, but I don’t think it quite makes sense and is unnecessary.) Timothy Olyphant is a great casting choice. I love Timothy Olyphant in what I see him in, but I’ve not seen the things he’s probably best known for–that’d be Justified and Deadwood, right? I should change that.

I loved this version of Cobb. I loved his developing relationship with the Mandalorian. I loved that they parted ways with Din having yet another ally to call on if needed. I loved the moment when Mando whacks Cobb’s jetpack and he flails off in a briefly comical echo of Boba Fett’s demise.

I loved seeing further personification and complexity applied to the Tusken Raiders. I loved the Western vibes. I’m a little over Tatooine, but if they can maybe stop coming back here all the time, I’ll have loved what they did with it, how they made it familiar yet fresh, shown from a different angle.

I loved the mysterious appearance of Temuera Morrison at the end. Is he Boba Fett, surviving as a lone wanderer in the Tatooine wastes? Is he some other Fett clone who just so happens to have taken up residence in Boba’s presumed final resting place? How will he connect to the larger events in the show?

I learned over last season to just let the show build at its own pace. It’ll get to where it wants to go in time, and it’ll surely surprise me with how it uses the foundations it’s set up along the way–things and people and places I didn’t even realize were supposed to be foundational.

Bottom line: I love that Mando’s back!

Review: Camp Cretaceous

The Jurassic Park movies have always sorta-kinda been family adventure films. Yes, there are many deaths, some graphically depicted, and there are plenty of frights, but they’re never particularly gory or horrifying films. There have always been some kids swathed in plot armor to accompany the protagonists. And kids naturally love and are fascinated by dinosaurs, even the theme-park monsters of the films, which once upon a time were overall rather accurate and remain strikingly realistic in action. I remember watching Jurassic Park around age 5 or 6, too young for the movie, absolutely enchanted by the glimpses of dinosaurs and thrilled by the adventure story and so scared of the kitchen scene I couldn’t even watch it the first time or two.

All that to say, it makes sense, from a certain point of view, to make a children’s show version of Jurassic Park. It certainly makes sense from a merchandising perspective, and I knew more about the toy line than the show’s premise up until a week or two before its release. But it also limits what the show can be about. If nothing else, the show must be more toned down, more tame, than any of the movies. Sure enough, a few anonymous or unlikable adults meet their ends more-or-less off-screen, and the kids (and even sympathetic adults) preserve the plot armor that always surrounds kids in these stories–at least until the final couple episodes, when the show genuinely manages to raise the stakes and suggest that the protagonists might not all make it through.

Camp Cretaceous is focused largely on tracking the developing relationships between the disparate kids who win a trip to the eponymous summer camp and then must somehow survive it. These kids initially come off as tired stereotypes: the dino nerd, the spoiled rich kid, the popular girl (upgraded to the current era as a social media influencer), the jock, the goofball extrovert, and the neurotic coward. The stereotypes are more or less played straight for the first couple episodes, but over the course of the show, all the characters gain nuance and depth, and they all reveal secret strengths and weaknesses. They are pushed past the breaking point as they attempt to survive, and they sometimes come close to fracturing but manage to stand together. By the end of the show, I liked all the characters.

I also really liked Bumpy, the sidekick Ankylosaurus infant who becomes a constant companion to the children as everything goes to hell. Bumpy has an adorable design. As much as Bumpy is designed to sell toys, she still had a big impact on me. I was constantly cheering on or worrying about Bumpy, even though I knew there was no way the show’s creators would ever let anything bad happen to her. Bumpy really steals the show.

The show’s premise remains pretty basic and in line with the first four Jurassic Park films: people go to an island with genetically engineered dinosaurs, bad things happen, and they must try to escape with their lives. In some ways, it’s a disappointing step back toward the formulaic just as Fallen Kingdom and Battle at Big Rock opened the franchise up to a much greater variety of storytelling possibilities. Still, the formula has worked well enough so far, and I had fun watching it. In truth, while the show has now been out for a couple weeks, I binged the eight twenty-something-minute episodes on its release night. The story might be conventional, but it’s a clever retelling of Jurassic World, with the characters reacting to similar events on Isla Nublar way across the island from the main park. There are some cameos from the film, mostly of the dinosaur variety, and we get to see more of the park. I’d go so far as to say that you shouldn’t watch Camp Cretaceous until you’ve watched (or rewatched) Jurassic World, as it’s rewarding to pick up on the copious nods to the film. There is a healthy dose of dramatic irony throughout that’s best appreciated with the foreknowledge of plot awareness.

This show manages to be awe-inspiring, exhilarating, often wickedly funny, and surprisingly character-focused (in the way that the best Jurassic Park films are). It’s not really doing anything new, but it returns to core concepts and tells a good story. And while the character and vehicle models are a bit basic, and some of the animation a little too frictionless, the dinosaurs look really good. It’s fun to watch, and for Jurassic Park fans at least, it’s worth it. Given how it ended, I’m looking forward to the eventual second season.

Harley Quinn Fever

Thanks to HBO Max, my wife and I have now watched Birds of Prey (and the Fantabulous Emancipation of One Harley Quinn) and the Harley Quinn animated series. We loved them both.

My wife prefers Margot Robbie’s depiction, and Robbie is certainly doing a fantastic job, really raising the profile of the character in the public consciousness and providing a fun, whimsical, zany take. She was fun in Suicide Squad, but that movie had plenty of baggage. Birds of Prey is starring, written, and directed by women and presents its female antiheroes as flawed, bizarre, unusual birds of a feather, portrayed as complex and whole people, with a general avoidance of the male gaze. Quinn is coming off a breakup with the Joker, bouncing back from heartbreak, moving on from a life in the supervillain’s shadow, and finding both freedom and danger now that she is out of the Clown Prince of Crime’s bubble. She quickly becomes wrapped up in the lives of three other women and a young girl who are all caught up in taking down the criminal organization of the chillingly psychopathic Black Mask. The narrative chronology is a little more twisted up than it needs to be, but filtered through the unreliable narration of Harley Quinn, the film’s a blast. While the Joker is a driving force behind who Harley Quinn is at the start of the film, he’s entirely absent. This is largely to the film’s benefit, as it can then be about Harley and her new “friends,” but it is a curious choice, given that the film presents itself as a continuation of the same character from Suicide Squad. Sure, the Joker’s not good for Harley, and he was just as monstrous to Dr. Quinzel as any other version of the character, but the two seemed closely bonded and reciprocally loyal. What changed between them?

I really enjoyed Birds of Prey, but I actually favor Harley Quinn. This show provides Harley, voiced here by Kaley Cuoco, a little more autonomy from the get-go, as it is she who breaks up with the abusive Joker. He puts quite a lot of effort into getting her back at first, and then trying to kill her, and then trying to use her, but thanks to her close friendship with Poison Ivy, she is able to persevere and move on, forming her own criminal crew first to get back at Joker and later to do her own thing. Cuoco endows the character with considerable up-beat manic energy, sometimes disrupted by a depressive low (often when finally taking a moment to contemplate how her actions have hurt someone else, or how the Joker or her parents have traumatized her in some way), and sometimes masked in her conversation with Joker in cutesy line delivery straight out of Batman: The Animated Series. One of the things I’ve enjoyed in the series is how it draws on a variety of past representations of characters to distill something new, like the elements of Quinn drawn from that older series, among other comic and film interpretations. Other great examples: Bane is basically a parody of his The Dark Knight Rises version (with some DCAU influence mixed in), Lex Luthor feels straight out of the DCAU, Joker’s appearance changes over the show’s timeline to mirror different versions of the character, Kite Man has his “Hell yeah” catchphrase from his more recent comics incarnation, and Mr. Freeze is given an arc that at first appears to subvert his tragic story from the DCAU only to ultimately play it straight. Some versions of characters are just wacky and new: Commissioner Gordon is a shadow of his former self, lonely and rambling, teetering on the edge of insanity; the Penguin is a hardened criminal mastermind but also something of a family man; the Riddler is a little unhinged, a little weird, quite the survivor, and eventually really buff. The mixing of backgrounds and characterizations, and references to deep cuts from the comics and shows, quickly establishes a rich and varied timeline, of which we’ve only seen bits and pieces. It makes Harley Quinn and her gang feel like just a small (though significant) part of a much bigger world, benefiting from the depth of accumulated storytelling to quickly achieve a sense of a lived-in setting in a way that Justice League Unlimited and Young Justice also used to great effect. And I especially like that under all the layers of comics lore, the show is still fundamentally about a woman figuring out who she really is as she sets out in a newly independent life and tries to set aside the traumas of her past. There are only two seasons so far, but I sure hope we get more of the show.

Both of these versions of Harley Quinn are very good. The former is a good movie and the latter is a good show. I recommend them both. You can easily watch them both on HBO Max now. (Blessedly, Warner Media is moving away from the DC Universe / HBO Max divide. For all the evils of these mega corporations, the least they could do is provide all their television and movie offerings on a single streaming service.)

Taking a Prehistoric Road Trip

I recently had the pleasure of watching the three-part PBS miniseries Prehistoric Road Trip. It’s hosted by Emily Graslie, a science educator affiliated with the Chicago Field Museum. I wasn’t familiar with her before this, but you might know her from projects like her YouTube series, “The Brain Scoop.” Graslie is a delightfully energetic, goofy, nerdy, and thoughtful host, and the show thrives off her charisma as she interacts with a variety of paleontologists throughout the series.

Over the course of the three episodes, Graslie takes us on, well, a Prehistoric Road Trip across Great Plains states to see a variety of fossil collections, active dig sites, and other unique locations that represent millions of years of geologic and paleontological history. What sets this show apart from the dozens of other shows about paleontology and prehistoric creatures is that it is firmly centered on contemporary subjects, showcasing a wide range of modern-day researchers, highlighting interesting areas of current research, and discussing issues that I just haven’t really seen in any similar shows. Some of these interesting issues included the relationship between scientists and landowners, the historic colonialist abuses of mineral and scientific natural resources on indigenous lands and current efforts to reverse those trends, and how studies of past climate change show how unique and dangerous the current man-made climate change event is.

We still get to see a lot of cool prehistoric animals, plants, and even bacteria, but the view is more focused on the fossils themselves (although there are some beautiful still reconstructions along the way in the form of sketches and mounts), ranging from freshly discovered in the ground to mounted in museum displays. Along the way, there’s plenty of opportunity for the layperson to learn about how fossils are discovered and prepared, how decisions are made about what to do with fossils, how fossils can be valuable in different types of research, and even how anyone can volunteer to participate in digs. We get a little bit of the history of paleontology in the American West along the way.

It was really cool to hear from a range of voices that most people probably haven’t heard from before. The number of female and indigenous voices was especially cool, given how paleontology has often seemed to be a field overwhelmingly dominated by white men in the past.

Each episode is a little under an hour, and there are only three. If you have even the slightest interest in paleontology or prehistoric creatures, you should check this out. If you’re a layperson paleontology fan like myself, I feel confident you’ll learn at least one new thing and will have a lot of fun along the way!

BMO’s The Sheriff Now

I wanted to take a quick break from the absolutely stupid amount of Jurassic World: Evolution I’ve been playing to say that the new Adventure Time: Distant Lands – BMO was an absolute delight. It was exactly what I’d hope for an extended episode focused on BMO: silly yet melancholic, delightfully weird, cute and dark. And the ending offers a twisty reinterpretation of where this story sits in the timeline–I didn’t anticipate it, for sure.

I don’t think the episode alone makes even a month of HBO Max worthwhile though, if that’s your only reason for it. But I think it would be a great idea to wait for the full four episodes of Distant Lands to come out and to then pay for a single month’s subscription (or take advantage of a free trial, if available). As for me, I’ve enjoyed HBO Max’s lineup, and while it’s not my favorite subscription service, it’s at least making it easy for me to catch up on years’ worth of prestige television I ignored when people were talking about it. Hopefully new original content will make an ongoing subscription worthwhile, but for now I definitely prefer the functionality of HBO Max for those older shows in contrast to what I always found to be a clunky user interface with Amazon Prime.