Review: Camp Cretaceous Season 3

Camp Cretaceous returned on May 21st with a 10-part third season, and I found it to be an improvement over the sophomore round in just about every way. While–spoiler alert–the kids more or less retain plot armor, they are pushed more than ever before, and their lives are threatened and the stakes are higher than ever.

We’re reunited with the Camp Fam as they fail yet another attempt to escape the island and literally return to the drawing board. They’ve fallen into a “comfortable” routine on the island. They know how to survive its prehistoric hazards. They’ve had enough time without the constant threat of death to form some cozy bonds and petty rivalries. But things soon take a turn for the worse, as the escaped hybrid only hinted at in the last season begins to wreak havoc on the neo-Mesozoic ecosystem. The kids suddenly find the park animals acting erratically and dangerously, and they’re hunted by an antisocial killing machine that doesn’t act in a predictable way. Added to the mix, we–and they–learn that six months have passed since the events of Jurassic World, and mercenary teams soon arrive with Dr. Wu to recover needed genetic materials and research for his continued hybridization projects. (We’re introduced to that last element in one of the best sequences in the season, which directly dovetails with the opening moments of Fallen Kingdom.) The kids are torn between the need to escape, the drive to stop Dr. Wu from furthering his amoral research, and the hope of saving the dinosaurs from re-extinction at the claws of the loose hybrid monster on the island.

All the kids have satisfying arcs this time around, without the frustrating tendency to regress at key dramatic moments that was so common in the earlier seasons. They have history together now, and the show built on and used that to further challenge the characters, rather than tonally resetting them at times to create convenient interrelationship tension. Once more, though, the highlight of the season for me was Ben, who matured so much over season two and now is really struggling with the idea of leaving the island and his beloved Bumpy behind. It was a fun way to continue pushing on this character. He didn’t need to overcome fear; he’d conquered that. He didn’t need to develop independence or survival skills; he was already forced to do so. He’s loyal and strong. His weakness now lies in his rashness, in sometimes being a little too independent, and being uncertain about his ability to give his new life up and return to normal.

The art and animation look better than ever. Once more, we get additional prehistoric reptiles added to the field: setting aside the hybrid freak, this season sees a return of the Dimorphodons from Fallen Kingdom, and new-to-the-franchise Monolophosaurus and Ouranosaurus also show up. The dinosaurs look great. There aren’t any conspicuously big, flat plains sequences with reused dinosaur assets just standing about. Their animation makes them seem physically present, although at this point the show seems to have leaned into the whole pseudo-claymation aesthetic. The human character models are about the same, but environmental effects, like lighting, seem improved, and the show definitely shows an attention to detail in tracking continuity in clothing changes, dirt and grime, and even simple things like Brooklynn’s roots growing out as time has passed.

The hybrid dinosaur looks like an impressively disturbing monstrous first stab at creating the sort of creatures that could become Indominus or Indoraptor. But this new “original” hybrid, Scorpios, is also somewhat revolting to look at. Its proportions, its movements, are all off. It’s an effective monster, and its presence pushed the plot forward, but I sure hope this is truly the last hybrid we see (you know, outside of the fact that all the dinosaurs of Jurassic Park are hybrids that don’t look exactly like their real-life counterparts because, in-universe, they used DNA from sources like frogs to fill the gaps in the sequences).

There’s one dinosaur return I wasn’t expecting: that of Blue. This could have been heavy-handed, but she’s used sparingly, and it actually turned out to be a nice encounter in which this unique Velociraptor, established to have special characteristics of intelligence and empathy, is given a reason to develop some wary trust of humans. It’s not a necessary foundational step to her sparing Owen and his friends at the end of Fallen Kingdom, but it works as a little stepping stone on the path to that moment, with the ground having been laid, of course, by Owen himself as her trainer.

This season has bigger stakes, clearer theme and purpose, deeper character development, further improved art and animation, and direct continuity with the film universe that gives it a sense of greater relevance. It’s a high point for the show so far, and I hope that it continues for at least another season.


Quick season-end spoiler discussion here. They’re finally off the island, but it seems a certain predator might be hidden away aboard the ship. If there isn’t another season, that leaves some dire implications. After all, they have a flash drive showing Dr. Wu’s research, and they have every desire to see him face justice. And they know that he was back on the island in an attempt to continue his research. But he seems to have evaded any serious consequences and successfully escaped any scrutiny about ongoing research by the time of Fallen Kingdom.

On the other hand, it’s probably worth noting that the Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom Survival Guide reports that “Dr. Henry Wu was found guilty of bioethical misconduct and stripped of all his credentials” (p. 20). I’m not sure that this line in a tie-in book aimed at kids substantiates that he did face some sort of penalties; it’s also not clear to me exactly what specific crimes he was found guilty of, or by what sort of judicial system. Again, given the audience, and given the fact that the in-universe nature of the text is that of a guide quickly assembled on last-minute notice by Claire Dearing for her Dinosaur Protection Group team before their Lockwood Foundation-backed mission to Isla Nublar, it could just be an inaccurate turn of phrase that might refer to a finding of fault in some sort of civil proceeding, or perhaps a finding of ethical misconduct by a professional board. It would be satisfying if the kids’ efforts led to some of these suggested consequences.

Given that we last see the kids aboard a yacht in the middle of the Pacific Ocean with a perhaps hungry mystery dinosaur trapped on board, there’s not a guarantee that they meet a happy end! Of course, even without another season, we could come up with alternatives to address this ambiguity, even if it turns out that Dr. Wu never did face serious consequences between films. Perhaps something happens to the disc but they’re okay. Perhaps, like in the original Jurassic Park novel, the Costa Rican government detains these survivors and attempts to cover things up to save further international embarrassment. Perhaps their findings aren’t enough to persuade any governing body to take action. Perhaps it’s something else entirely! I’m sure the show won’t kill the kids and isn’t considering that as a serious outcome, but it’s still enough for me to anxiously await the next season.

(For a bit of a reality check and some reassurance about the fates of these kids and their left-behind pet dinosaur, and actually for some interesting thoughts from Colin Trevorrow in general, read this from The Hollywood Reporter.)

Review: Camp Cretaceous Season 2

I watched the eight episodes of season two over their release weekend, but I didn’t feel particularly compelled to put my thoughts down right after. I think that impulse reflects what season two turned out to be: a pleasant but forgettable bit of television comfort food. I suppose that this puts it rather in line with my impression of the first season, but the first improved over the course of its run and set up exciting possibilities for the second, and I just don’t feel like the follow-up season really ran with anything or even attempted anything new. It did, at least, have several exciting action sequences!

As I mentioned in my first review, this show is rather character-focused over anything else. So, after having grown fond of the kids in the first season, I was simultaneously pleased with and disappointed by their portrayals in this season. This time around, there were more moments where the kids could almost relax, where they tried to just act like kids, but there’d always be some harsh new reality to force them back into survival mode. They’ve grown as characters, and they all get opportunities to shine. They’re also a rather tightly knit found family, although the constant stress does lead to inevitable infighting at times. All that said, sometimes the show forced an arbitrary regression of a character to suit the plot of a particular episode. In finding a situation for the star athlete Yaz to truly learn that sometimes she couldn’t help, sometimes even her best wasn’t enough, and sometimes she had to rest, the writers forced spoiled rich kid Kenji back into his obnoxiously lazy and selfish role to act as a foil. Sure, Kenji’s dumb and self-centered, but he’d come a tremendous way in the first season, and this felt like an unnecessary step back for him. At the same time, the show does appear to want to show what trauma looks like for these children, and having moments of regression does seem natural. Clearly, the show didn’t always convince me that that’s what was going on, though.

The best character development this season goes to Ben, presumed dead by the other campers (though the show made clear enough he’d survived at the very end of season one). Once he’s reintroduced as a wannabe-commando figure to a couple of his friends, the show focuses a whole episode on his arc of surviving on the island alone for however many days (or weeks) have elapsed. He was forced to find his own inner strength and courage, he prevailed over a series of hazards, and he eventually reached a point of power and competence. Yet he’s still Ben, the skinny, dweebish little kid, and so he’s also developed the amusing quirk in which he believes that he’s tougher than anyone else, all evidence to the contrary. With a whole episode devoted just to his survival story, however, it was still a little goofy that it conveniently skips over the point at which he’d made some serious outfit adjustments, and it just as conveniently has a brief falling out between Ben and Bumpy that allows Bumpy to mature into a full-size Ankylosaurus off-screen. (Bumpy remains as adorable as ever, even fully grown, and I still cheered for Bumpy whenever she did anything at all.)

The plot is more disappointing. The first season focused on the attempt to reach the evacuation point in time; the group failed, of course. This season again finds the kids attempting to reach a target for rescue–actually, two targets. The first one is an emergency beacon that can call for help. That objective is accomplished rather handily with the group’s new survival skills and teamwork. However, typical chaos ensues involving a Tyrannosaurus, and the kids aren’t sure if their message got through. They soon after stumble upon a small party of “ecotourists” who have made their way to the island in the days since the park shutdown. These yuppie adventurers promise the kids access to their yacht in a few days when it returns from refueling. They’re lying, and how the kids react to their alleged rescuers–and how the rescuers respond–becomes the major point of conflict for the remainder of the season. It’s all for naught because (spoiler alert) the kids find themselves stranded on the island once more, yet again barely missing a boat off the island.

The stakes felt lower this season. The adults could serve as dino food, but the show largely stepped back from any real sense that any of the kids would ever actually die. This made many of the dinosaur attacks (so, so many dinosaur attacks) thrilling rather than horrifying, but if the action-adventure show about killer dinosaurs doesn’t really have killer dinosaurs, it loses its edge fast. Likewise, there weren’t really any great moments of wonder this season. The closest would be the discovery of a watering hole shared by several dinosaur species, but it’s populated with dinosaurs we’re already familiar with, and something about the lighting or dinosaur models or design just made it feel like a bunch of CG dinosaur assets positioned around a flat surface. (Yes, of course, they’re always CGI effects, but the quality did not support the emotional effect needed from the scene.) On the other hand, many of the dinosaur attack sequences looked very real, as though the dinosaurs occupied physical sets, although in a somewhat jarring manner, as though they were claymation.

We get some new dinosaurs, but mostly it’s reused assets from before. That means that at some point, it begins to feel like the park is dominated by Parasaurolophus, Brachiosaurus, Stegosaurus, and Sinoceratops (especially unusual given that the ceratopsian is supposed to be a recent addition to the park, yet we don’t really see Triceratops or Styracosaurus). Where are the herds of diverse dinosaurs present in the films? I recognize the answer to that is that the show has a limited budget compared to a movie, but I can’t help but think how diverse and lifelike the dinosaurs look in Jurassic World: Evolution, a video game that also simulates animal and tourist behaviors, weather effects, and a park economy. There are some new dinosaurs, carnivores pulled from the films: Ceratosaurus and Baryonyx. However, the former only has a couple appearances. Meanwhile, the Baryonyx has been reimagined as a very social pack hunter and terrestrial pursuit predator, which raises the question: why did they use Baryonyx at all? It felt more than a little like the showrunners really wanted a predator to fill the gap left by the Velociraptors, so they just forced an animal into the role. Fallen Kingdom‘s introduction of Baryonyx was already far enough from the real animal, but the creatures in Camp Cretaceous seem rather out of step with the semiaquatic, piscivorous but opportunistic spinosaurid that the real animal appears to have been. (And why do you pick Baryonyx for this role when Allosaurus is also in the park, similarly sized, and an actual big game predator that might have actually coordinated in social groups?! Or why not Ceratosaurus, already an asset in the show??)

All that said, it might seem foolish to once again be hopeful about the next season. But there are several elements in play here that should finally push the story in new directions:

  1. The kids have decided to try to find their own way off the island, rather than being dependent on rescue, and they all now have the survival skills to potentially achieve that without always being on the run.
  2. The kids do not know if the emergency beacon worked, but the audience knows that a successful transmission was sent–to whom remains the big question.
  3. The kids accidentally unleashed some new experimental creature on the island, which will almost surely be a focus for the third season. (Is it a prototype Indoraptor or something else entirely?)

We have the pieces but I can’t see what this jigsaw puzzle is supposed to form. I’ll be interested to see what answers the show arrives at.

Review: Camp Cretaceous

The Jurassic Park movies have always sorta-kinda been family adventure films. Yes, there are many deaths, some graphically depicted, and there are plenty of frights, but they’re never particularly gory or horrifying films. There have always been some kids swathed in plot armor to accompany the protagonists. And kids naturally love and are fascinated by dinosaurs, even the theme-park monsters of the films, which once upon a time were overall rather accurate and remain strikingly realistic in action. I remember watching Jurassic Park around age 5 or 6, too young for the movie, absolutely enchanted by the glimpses of dinosaurs and thrilled by the adventure story and so scared of the kitchen scene I couldn’t even watch it the first time or two.

All that to say, it makes sense, from a certain point of view, to make a children’s show version of Jurassic Park. It certainly makes sense from a merchandising perspective, and I knew more about the toy line than the show’s premise up until a week or two before its release. But it also limits what the show can be about. If nothing else, the show must be more toned down, more tame, than any of the movies. Sure enough, a few anonymous or unlikable adults meet their ends more-or-less off-screen, and the kids (and even sympathetic adults) preserve the plot armor that always surrounds kids in these stories–at least until the final couple episodes, when the show genuinely manages to raise the stakes and suggest that the protagonists might not all make it through.

Camp Cretaceous is focused largely on tracking the developing relationships between the disparate kids who win a trip to the eponymous summer camp and then must somehow survive it. These kids initially come off as tired stereotypes: the dino nerd, the spoiled rich kid, the popular girl (upgraded to the current era as a social media influencer), the jock, the goofball extrovert, and the neurotic coward. The stereotypes are more or less played straight for the first couple episodes, but over the course of the show, all the characters gain nuance and depth, and they all reveal secret strengths and weaknesses. They are pushed past the breaking point as they attempt to survive, and they sometimes come close to fracturing but manage to stand together. By the end of the show, I liked all the characters.

I also really liked Bumpy, the sidekick Ankylosaurus infant who becomes a constant companion to the children as everything goes to hell. Bumpy has an adorable design. As much as Bumpy is designed to sell toys, she still had a big impact on me. I was constantly cheering on or worrying about Bumpy, even though I knew there was no way the show’s creators would ever let anything bad happen to her. Bumpy really steals the show.

The show’s premise remains pretty basic and in line with the first four Jurassic Park films: people go to an island with genetically engineered dinosaurs, bad things happen, and they must try to escape with their lives. In some ways, it’s a disappointing step back toward the formulaic just as Fallen Kingdom and Battle at Big Rock opened the franchise up to a much greater variety of storytelling possibilities. Still, the formula has worked well enough so far, and I had fun watching it. In truth, while the show has now been out for a couple weeks, I binged the eight twenty-something-minute episodes on its release night. The story might be conventional, but it’s a clever retelling of Jurassic World, with the characters reacting to similar events on Isla Nublar way across the island from the main park. There are some cameos from the film, mostly of the dinosaur variety, and we get to see more of the park. I’d go so far as to say that you shouldn’t watch Camp Cretaceous until you’ve watched (or rewatched) Jurassic World, as it’s rewarding to pick up on the copious nods to the film. There is a healthy dose of dramatic irony throughout that’s best appreciated with the foreknowledge of plot awareness.

This show manages to be awe-inspiring, exhilarating, often wickedly funny, and surprisingly character-focused (in the way that the best Jurassic Park films are). It’s not really doing anything new, but it returns to core concepts and tells a good story. And while the character and vehicle models are a bit basic, and some of the animation a little too frictionless, the dinosaurs look really good. It’s fun to watch, and for Jurassic Park fans at least, it’s worth it. Given how it ended, I’m looking forward to the eventual second season.