Review: Children of the Jedi

Children of the Jedi (Star Wars: The Callista Trilogy, #1)Children of the Jedi by Barbara Hambly

My rating: 2 of 5 stars

From what I gather, people typically love or hate this book. In a book in which Luke falls in love after entering into a remote relationship conducted through computer chats with a dead person, I think it’s reasonable to expect that it would be polarizing. My own feelings about it did not reach either extreme, however.

There were things I liked. I liked this depiction of Leia as a strong statesman who has not fully pursued her latent Force abilities, and who is haunted by her witnessing of the destruction of Alderaan. I liked the treatment of the Death Star architect war criminals, and Leia’s complicated feelings on that subject. I liked the fleshing out of Elder Houses and some of Leia’s background in Alderaanian royalty (though I like what the new canon has done with this far more). I liked C-3PO’s role in the plot, and I liked that he wasn’t treated solely as comic relief or an afterthought; I find that I really like whenever someone finds something for Threepio to do in a story. I liked some of the weird science philosophy musings on the nature of sentience and the division between synthetic and organic intelligences, but I didn’t expect a Star Wars story to ask heavy questions about the nature of consciousness and what defines a person as distinct, or whether someone can be replicated in a move from organic to robotic (which the book cutely distills to a question of identity as to whether someone might be “another Corellian of the same name”). I similarly liked Hambly’s effort to wrangle with the limitations of the Force when it came to mechanicals. And I liked the new alien races and many of the new characters–I especially loved the nature-loving ex-stormtrooper Triv Pothman and the Force Ghost of former Jedi adventurer Callista.

There were also things I did not like. I did not like the pacing of the book, and the tone often felt very not-Star Wars, whatever that means exactly. It often was slow, reflective, and grounded. For a Star Wars story, I found these elements to be somewhat boring. Also, Luke is really wrung through over the course of the story; in an effort to limit his god-tier Force powers, the narrative breaks him down physically and mentally. He acts like a heroic Jedi throughout, though torn by his personal connections (in other words, he acts like Luke). But it is exhausting to read how exhausted he gets, how much pain he experiences. He is in perpetual excruciating pain and operating with pretty extreme sleep deprivation for much of the book. It’s a bit much, but I get that authors often struggled with how to use Jedi Master Luke. I similarly did not care for his relationship with Callista (and definitely prefer that Luke ends up with Mara, who is a more interesting partner for him). They fell in love too fast and with too little reason. How she is brought back to life is also rather morally questionable. And while R2-D2 gets to be useful, I really hate how he almost kills Han and Leia (even if he didn’t have control of himself at the time).

There are other things that I don’t feel strongly about. Han and Chewie were more support characters, but they were portrayed accurately. The battle moon that serves as the central threat of the novel is just a Death Star Lite, but at least it’s not another literal Death Star. The supporting threat of a cyborg augmentation that allows a Force-user to control droids seemed wildly bizarre to me. The Ismarens would have been more interesting villains if more time had been spent on them, although Roganda, calculating and bitter former concubine of Palpatine, felt at least like a unique sort of threat. There are a lot of tropes that don’t feel like they should be in a Star Wars story, like what amounts to a minor zombie threat, although I recognize that zombies (or something similar) have ended up in use in many Star Wars stories, so it’s hard for me to identify what exactly felt off about it. Mara Jade and Lando Calrissian have insignificant cameo appearances, and they’re not really out of character but they don’t really have the chance to act in character, either. Finally, the novel is necessarily dated by its release before the prequel trilogy, so a lot of the details about an enclave of Jedi children, and the apparently accepted presence of Jedi families, no longer make a lot of sense, even though I could accept the broad idea that Jedi would care for Force-strong younglings.

I liked the writing and the weirdness, even though I didn’t like how everything worked as a Star Wars story about the Big Three heroes of the original trilogy. I’d be interested in reading non-Star Wars works by Hambly. I don’t regret reading this book, and it’s definitely not the worst Star Wars book I’ve read. On the other hand, I wouldn’t join with those who love it in recommending it to others. It was, if nothing else, an interesting experience.

Concluding the weekend

This weekend was sort of a “project” weekend.

My wife and I were sharing one of our spare bedrooms as an office, but the size of the room and hardwood floors apparently resulted in poor sound quality for her podcast recordings, regardless of what she tried to do to improve the situation. She ended up moving to a nook in our basement, with plenty of wood panelling and carpeted flooring to apparently resolve those problems. She set it up into a nice little office space, and after a couple weeks went by, she pushed me to make “our” office my own.

So my project this Saturday was clearing out the piles of unpacked stuff and reorganizing. Finally the room looks “finished,” no longer in that transient post-move state. And I reorganized the shelves in the room, the location of my desk and office equipment, and even what sort of books were on display up there (versus in the basement with most of the books).

Saturday was also unique in that our 60-pound, year-old puppy split a toenail, requiring a semi-urgent trip to the vet to get the nail removed to the bone bed. She’s on antibiotics and pain meds now, cone secured around her neck, and being pampered. She’s doing fine. Still, it was quite eventful at the time. And weird to go to the vet during the pandemic–you drive out, call them, then they come out and get the pet from your car, and you wait in the car for another call with an update before they finally return your buddy.

Today was Mother’s Day. We made sure to call our mothers, who are in Florida, and it’s one of those days I wish we were closer. It’s a reality we’ve adjusted to at this point, several years into living in Indiana. We don’t have kids of our own, so nothing special happened in our home. I tried to mow the lawn and more or less finished the back yard before a thunderstorm raced through, drenching the ground (and pounding me with a little sleet or hail or something before the first distant rumble of thunder made me finally give up).

The evening has been spent reading and gaming today. I’m nearly finished with the Las Venturas missions in San Andreas. I had forgotten how much things slowed down toward the end. By Venturas, you’re so removed from the intimate struggles of Grove Street, and you lose most of the close interactions with family and friends from San Fierro. You just…do stuff. C.J. seems to have fun prepping for a big heist with his pal Woozy, who folds him in as a casino business partner. But I’m just itching to get back to Los Santos to bring the story home.

The book I’ve spent time with today is Children of the Jedi. It’s rather slow for a Star Wars book, although I like a lot of the ideas and themes explored. I’ve been picking slowly at it, and I’m a little anxious to finish it too and move on to some library books I’ve been sitting on.

I also just learned that I’ve missed out on a heck of a lot of story expansions to Jurassic World: Evolution, including missions that appear to cover at least alternative plots for virtually all of the movies, so I’m eager to get into that, too.

Finally, I’ve been watching a lot of TV, mostly cartoons. I’m currently rotating between Rebels, Cheers, The Simpsons, and DuckTales. I’m falling in love with Rebels all over again. And DuckTales was a Twitter mutual’s recommendation that has proven very worthwhile.

I wanted to post something for today, and so it’s been one of those rambling update posts. I’m satisfied with it though. Now to settle down and get ready for the week ahead…