TCW 7.3: “On the Wings of Keeradaks”

Okay, this is a super-short post. The episode was entertaining to watch, I’m glad to have Echo back, and I like the Bad Batch, but we’ve sort of seen this plot many times before on this show. Daring mission goes sideways, and the Jedi/clones have to convince neutral locals to fight back–conveniently just in time for the Separatists to track them down and rain fire on everyone. Don’t get me wrong: this was another enjoyable episode. I just don’t find that I have anything to say about it. Rex and especially Echo have been through a lot. I don’t know how much time the show will have to address Echo’s trauma and apparent difficulty with readjusting, but I’m confident we’ll get to see something approaching a conclusion to Rex’s arc from inexhaustible loyalist to rule-bending, free-thinking, war-weary veteran.

TCW 7.2: “A Distant Echo”

I have a very narrow reaction to this latest episode. There is plenty to say if I wanted: it’s a beautiful, emotionally powerful episode with a fun adventure/thriller plot that ends in a heartbreaking revelation. It’s good Star Wars and good storytelling. And it looks and sounds great throughout. But the only thing I really want to say is, bless The Clone Wars for coming back, if only for this moment:

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It was always easy enough to read in Attack of the Clones that Obi-Wan knew about how Anakin felt for Padmé. And of course Obi-Wan deduces that Anakin is the father of the unborn child(ren) Padmé is carrying in Revenge of the Sith. But I love how The Clone Wars has teased out how much Obi-Wan knew, how much he understands Anakin’s affection for Padmé and how that could pull on his loyalty to the Jedi Code. Obi-Wan had experienced that competition himself with Satine Kryze. Obi-Wan and Anakin often have veiled conversations about Anakin’s feelings, even though Anakin insists on hiding the truth, even though Obi-Wan refuses to admit how much he knows, or suspects. This little moment in “A Distant Echo,” so close to the events of Revenge of the Sith, is such a delightful exchange. Obi-Wan comes as close as he probably ever was able to in laying out all he knew. And even in this moment, he doesn’t condemn Anakin or force the conversation. And Anakin’s look back to Obi-Wan…

Look, a lot of people don’t like Revenge of the Sith. And like all Star Wars, it’s not perfect. But the fraying of relationships between Anakin on one side and Obi-Wan and Padmé on the other has always twisted at my heartstrings. And moments like this just add further emotional nuance and dramatic irony. The Clone Wars gave so much depth to the prequel trilogy and to the Star Wars galaxy as a whole. I’m glad to see that it came back firing on all cylinders, ready to continue revising and refreshing our understanding of that galaxy and the characters who populate it.

TCW 7.1: “Bad Batch”

Maybe it’s that I just finished my rewatch of the first six seasons of The Clone Wars earlier this week, but watching “Bad Batch,” it felt like the show never left. For newcomers, this is a perfectly serviceable action episode in a beautiful sci-fi setting, leavened by many comedic moments. For fans of the show, it’s a great time to reunite with Commander Cody, Captain Rex, Jesse, and Kix toward the end of the Clone Wars, as they attempt to salvage a losing front of the war, even while Rex begins to suspect that Echo, who appeared to die in a blast during the breakout of Even Piell from the Citadel back in the third season, is still alive. And while the Bad Batch, clone super-commandos with mutations that give them unique gifts in combat, is new, their designation as Clone Force 99 is a nice throwback to the deformed clone trooper 99, who sacrificed his life supporting the active troops in the defense of Kamino. The clones we know acknowledge the appropriateness of the name, but for any new viewers, there’s nothing to make this seem like a lot of additional explanation is required.

I never watched the animatics, other than a brief clip or two here and there, for the “Bad Batch” arc, but I had read enough about them to understand Echo’s role in it. This didn’t ruin the excitement and hope cultivated by this episode. And without having actually seen an early, incomplete version of the episode, it all felt new to me. I don’t know how closely the finished version adhered to the earlier version, and it doesn’t really matter to me. All I can say is, damn, this episode looked good. It’s incredible how far this show has come–and I guess six years of time since the last season gives plenty of opportunity to bring the computer animation technology even further forward. The emotional range and nuance depicted in the clones, the variability of character models and appearances and animations, and the breathtaking environmental and lighting effects (resulting in some stunning battle sequences) make the rest of this season very promising. And it’s not just art and animation. The sound design is incredible–I specifically remarked on this to my wife as we watched. The sound of the blaster shots and their impact into droids was so sharp and clear.

I really had no problems with the episode. The Clone Wars is back, and it’s picking right up from its late-series peak!