Super Smash Bros. Ultimate

I can start my return to this site off really easily: I gotĀ Super Smash Bros. UltimateĀ over the holiday break, and I like it. It is a good game. I also really suck at it. That is all.

Just kidding; of course I have a lot to say. But I’ll temper my reaction a bit, as there’s no reason for thousands of words on a game that has already been played and reviewed and combed over a great deal already.

I’ll try to limit this to pointing out what I really like. (What little I dislike is mostly trivial.)

I like that the game starts with the original roster of characters from the first game on N64.

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I like that the roster rapidly expands, with new challengers appearing in reaction to your own experimentation with the game modes. Play Smash, play some of the side games, play the Spirit Board, and you’re bound to rapidly unlock new characters.

I like how many new characters there are to unlock.

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I like that many of the new characters are fun to play as, and that the old characters are worth revisiting. I like that I was shaken out of some predictable play patterns–at least some of the time. Pikachu has always been, and will always be, my go-to fighter, no matter how many times I’m steam-rolled in an online match.

I love the wide variety of game modes to play. I like the different in-game currencies that encourage you to play different game modes. The game’s interface seems inspired by mobile games, with a constant drip of content that encourages constant engagement and micro-management. The Spirit Board is a mode where you can unlock new support spirits to power up your fighters; spirits rotate out on the board over time. You’re thus encouraged to attempt to unlock spirits while they’re available and to check back regularly for new spirits. It’s a good way to hop in for a quick challenge. Likewise, there’s a shop where you can spend another type of in-game currency to obtain a rotating assortment of extra items, spirits, Mii costumes, and music.

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I also like the Adventure mode. It offers a broad, overly dramatic story that quickly becomes inconsequential to the actual events of the game. But I like the sprawling map exploration, the JRPG-like roaming of an over-world as you hop from battle to battle, the gradual grind and collection, the varied challenges, the overarching sense of purpose. I haven’t played the Adventure mode all that much yet, but I’m turning more attention to it.

I like playing with friends locally and online, though the online aspect still has a lot of refinement to go. While lagging seems less and less frequent, it’s still infuriating when it happens. And there’s not yet a way to play couch co-op while also playing with your online friends–although I believe that this will be implemented. I have less fun in the quick matches with strangers, but I’ve never had that much fun with multiplayer games. And let me point out, again, that I really suck at this game. There are only so many times you can get your ass served to you before it gets a little old, and I’m past the age and lifestyle moment where I could devote enough time to the game to GIT GUD, even if I wanted to. But online play can still be fun!

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To reemphasize, I like that there’s so much to do, so much to try, so much to collect. There are so many fighters, spirits, costumes, levels, game modes, and songs. There’s a whole virtual jukebox built in to play all the songs that you’ve unlocked. And since I will remain fervently casual with the game, it’ll be a great experience to keep coming back to, to play with friends or to poke around in during special events. I’m not tired of the game yet, but when I inevitably become tired with it, I’ll be okay with putting it down and coming back to it weeks or months later to pick up where I left off. It’s a progressive improvement on the franchise, and it really appeals to nostalgia. There’s a lot of love for Nintendo’s game history here (and for many other classic video game properties, at this point).

This is a good game, and yet another indication that Nintendo is knocking it out of the park with the Switch and its first-party game releases.

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