That’s a wrap: The Mandalorian 1.8

Hoo boy, that was a good finale. Plot threads dangling throughout the season were resolved, there’s a clear sense of closure for this season, and there’s a clear and direct focus for next season. The Mandalorian and the Child are bonded like father and son, and they have allies who may come to stand by them again in the future (while unfortunately losing other allies in this explosive climax). And this final episode brought in a lot of elements from The Clone Wars and Rebels, in particular regarding the Mandalorians and one very special weapon.

I dearly hope that The Mandalorian honors its narrative promise to pursue the homeworld of Yoda’s species in this new season. But at the very least, the Mandalorian now believes he must care for a child of a culture (the Jedi) that has historically been an enemy of his adoptive people. That’s meaty enough to warrant another season or more by itself.

I was wrong: The Mandalorian 1.7

Over the past couple of episodes, I admit that I was getting a little frustrated with the pacing of the show. In retrospect, that was imprudent of me. The seventh episode pays off so many developments in earlier episodes. Characters and plot points carefully placed over time, in a way that feels strikingly organic, have now come together in an exciting way. And now we are moving at breakneck pace, the episode ending in a tragic cliffhanger. I was moved and surprised and impressed. And I’d have to say that (almost) every episode was vital for reaching this point.

Full speed ahead to the ending–but first, The Rise of Skywalker!

Big-shot gangster putting together a crew: The Mandalorian 1.6

In the immediate aftermath of the sixth episode of The Mandalorian, I’m excited. It was great fun watching the second half, with plenty of tense action and twists. We have some of the greatest fight scenes of the season, with the Mandalorian really showing off all his abilities. There’s a tense game of deadly hide-and-seek involving the child. We get glimpses of the state of the larger galaxy, both in the criminal underworld and in the Republic. We also get a few more hints about the Mandalorian’s past. And I was delighted by the presence of so many enjoyable actors: Richard Ayoade, whom I remember fondly as Moss from The IT Crowd, voices an arrogant mercenary droid; Clancy Brown, who voiced Savage Oppress (among other Star Wars characters), plays the hulking Devaronian muscle on the team; Mark Boone Junior, memorable as Bobby in Sons of Anarchy, plays the outlaw crew leader who throws together the operation; and the directors of other Mandalorian episodes cameo as X-Wing pilots. Then there are the actors I didn’t recognize, who you might, like Natalia Tena (whose roles include Nymphadora Tonks from the Harry Potter films) and Matt Lanter (whom I did not recognize in his small though crucial part as a scared security guard in this episode, and who voiced Anakin Skywalker in The Clone Wars).

But I remember how I felt during the first part, when Mando fills in the last spot of a five-person job to bust a target out of a New Republic prison ship. During those opening moments, our hero (or antihero) felt more like a silent video game protagonist than usual. As we were introduced to characters along with Mando, we learned that some knew him and some didn’t, some hated him and some liked him; the other characters traded verbal jabs, made jokes, and eluded to shady pasts. Meanwhile, Mando did a whole lot of staring silently through his helmet. We’ve seen this plot many times before too, in television episodes (not to mention series) and films and video games and books: a group of undesirables gets together for a job that should be simple, and then things go wrong. The episode doesn’t set the characters up much–they’re archetypes. The boss putting the job together has seen it all and is too old to go out on jobs himself anymore; the point guy is agitated and arrogant; the pilot is an aloof and brilliant droid that no one else fully trusts; the muscle is exactly that, big and mean; and then there’s the acrobat archetype, who is also the only female in the episode, written as a “sexy psychopath” like Harley Quinn. At first, they felt like unlikable versions of characters in The Fast and the FuriousGuardians of the Galaxy, or Suicide Squad–though one of the things I liked about the episode is that the second half shows that they are supposed to be unlikable, that they’re not good people.

More than anything else, the biggest flaw of this episode is that it doesn’t really progress the show in any way. The show in general is slow-paced in addressing its overarching narrative concerns, more focused on episodic adventures. This episode attempts to demonstrate that the Mandalorian is a changed man now (while also showing how much he hasn’t changed), but we’ve really already seen this in all of the previous episodes. Perhaps he hasn’t had to directly confront his past since turning his back on the guild, but it still felt superfluous, thematically covering content similar to that of the immediately preceding episode. Other than that, we know that others will still betray Mando to get the kid, that Mando has no safe harbor, and that the kid won’t be safe until the bounty hunters’ guild is dealt with. These are things we already knew. I had fun watching the episode, and I was stoked by the end of it, but I’m a little disappointed that it feels like the full eight episodes of the first season are going to be spent simply tying up loose ends with the bounty hunters guild. I’m happy to see Mando taking on odd jobs and dealing with political and interpersonal spaces directly altered by his decisions at the start of this season, but I’d like to get through some of the central conflicts left unresolved from the beginning. At the same time, with only 8 episodes averaging just over a half-hour in length, compared to a traditional action-drama with perhaps 13 (or even 22) episodes running 45 minutes to an hour, I recognize that I must seem impatient with what has in fact been fairly economical storytelling. At some point, though, the show has to do something else other than telling us the same thing over and over again.

Old Western Classic: The Mandalorian 1.5

In this episode, the Mandalorian finds his ship once more in disrepair after the opening scene, requiring a pit stop on one of the most familiar worlds of the Star Wars galaxy. He needs funds to cover the repairs, so he takes on a job acting as a mentor of sorts for a hotshot young guy eager to join the bounty hunters’ guild. This youngster (played by Toro Calican) is more hustler than professional, though, and their target is a hardened mercenary with a dreaded reputation (played by Ming-Na Wen). To round out the new characters, the backwater mechanic (played by Amy Sedaris) hired by the Mandalorian also picks up baby duty while he’s out trying to bring in the credits.

Much of the episode was a classic western bounty hunter story, culminating in a clash between young gun and old, and the setting of the episode encourages a Wild West vibe.

[Spoilers follow]

That said, not everything has to end up on Tatooine. I do get the impression that the Mandalorian has some background with the planet, between his familiarity with Jawas in an earlier episode and his easy ability to communicate and negotiate with the Tusken Raiders in this episode (nice to see the Tuskens treated as rational sentients instead of mindless, violent savages). It makes sense; a lot of seedy types with underworld connections would have had reason to spend time on the planet at some point. And I can hardly begrudge the use of the planet, and so many familiar vistas, when it really allows the episode to feel like a gritty episode of some forgotten Western.

I do hope that we get some story momentum soon, though. At this point, nothing’s happening too quickly, even though each episode remains individually entertaining.

A final question about the ending: who do you think the figure is who comes across Fennec Shand’s body? The usual suspects seem convinced that this is a hint at a Boba Fett reveal. I’d rather Fett not show up; there are already enough real Mandalorians in the show, thank you very much. Plus, dropping him in would almost necessitate considerable explanation, re-focusing at least one episode around the figure previously presumed dead. And to have him suddenly reappear, years after the rescue of Han Solo and defeat of Jabba the Hutt, would feel bizarre if without some sort of explanation. Anyway, if it is an existing Star Wars character, and I suspect it’s not, I would hope that it’s Cad Bane. The jingle of the spurs fits in with his cowboy aesthetic. And while Bane may have been intended to be killed off in a canceled arc from The Clone Wars, for now I think his fate is ambiguous. Either way, it seems easier for a Duros to bounce back from a blaster wound than anyone recovering from being eaten.

Two Samurai: The Mandalorian 1.4

In this episode, our intrepid bounty hunter attempts to find safe haven for his young ward, leading him to accept a job protecting a small farming village in exchange for lodging. It doesn’t work out as planned.

The Mandalorian seems like a man hungry for connection. He didn’t seem to quite fit in with his fellow Mandalorians, even though they aided him in the end. (It turns out that he’s adopted into the clan.) He was betrayed by his fellow bounty hunters–or I guess you could say he betrayed them by breaking the rules of the guild, but he saved a small child from torture and death, and they were motivated by greed in hunting him down, so it’s clear to me that they wronged him and not the other way around. But he was so quick to find a connection with the kid, and with Kuiil, and now with Cara Dune and the capable widow of the farming village (do we ever learn her name? I didn’t catch it). We learn that the Mandalorians gave him a community and a family when he had none, taking him in after the death of his parents, but the burden to remain separate and apart from others, to always keep his armor on and to never reveal his face, weighs heavily on him. Perhaps he was just too old to become a good Mandalorian, just like Anakin was too old to become a good Jedi, but it seems like he is increasingly wearied by those cultural obligations.

The structure of the episode’s main plot pulls heavily from the Samurai/Western roots of Star Wars, serving up a variant of the plot seen in Seven Samurai and The Magnificent Seven and, more recently, the “Bounty Hunters” episode of Star Wars: The Clone Wars. The structure is obvious, but the episode keeps its focus largely on the Mandalorian and his foster child; the adventure protecting the farmers is just one step in their journey, as the Mandalorian considers finding a safe place for at least one of them.

Another influence appears to be Ewoks: The Battle for Endor. The pirate raiders who live in the woods have a general aesthetic and purpose that appears to be half-Marauder, half-orc. The planet inhabited by the farmers and raiders, with its temperate forests and calm waterways, evokes Endor. Even the farmers’ residences are at least slightly reminiscent of concept art for the Ewok abodes in Return of the Jedi.

The raiders in the episode appear to be Klatooinian, but it’s hard for me to shake the impression of visual and thematic connectivity to that old Ewok movie.

We’re now halfway through this season, and I’m beginning to wonder if we ever will get bigger answers about just who and what Baby Yoda is. It’s seeming increasingly unimportant to the story being told here, where Baby Yoda is part MacGuffin and part softening agent for the protagonist. I could easily see the next four episodes telling a story of continued flight before the Mandalorian finally tries to take the fight to those who want this child so badly.

Escaping Expectations: The Mandalorian 1.3

[Note: spoilers for the first couple episodes follow.]

The story that this series is telling has become increasingly satisfying. In the first episode, we meet the Mandalorian, who takes on a dangerous job and successfully secures a vital target, which turns out to be a baby of an unknown species (or known–it’s not really clear to me how much people know about the species of Yoda and Yaddle in-universe). In the second episode, he must go through trials to get off-world, in so doing forming a bond with the youngling and learning that it possesses special powers; in the timeframe we’re in, it appears that most of the galaxy isn’t familiar with the Force and may not believe that the Jedi were ever real, so the Mandalorian does not appear to understand what he’s observed. In the third episode, he delivers the bounty–and then retrieves it. It feels like a complete story with a three-act structure over these past few episodes.

Now the story feels free to do…just about anything. Much like with the end of The Last Jedi, I can’t anticipate where the story might go; it feels complete in and of itself, even though there are plenty of threads to continue pursuing. I am sure we will learn more about the Mandalorians and what happened to them. I imagine that the story’s central Mandalorian will have more opportunities to advance within his culture, and it looks like we’re starting to get more and more details about his past. And we might have big answers about that Yodaling, or we might not.

This is turning into a great show! At the same time, I recognize the response from fans who note the lack of on-screen women, especially in speaking roles. It’s true that there aren’t many speaking characters at all, but it is also a little bizarre that all but one character with lines of dialogue so far is a man. When we see the Mandalorians together in this episode, for instance, it’s disconcerting that their apparent leader is a woman but all of her followers speak in deep masculine voices. Perhaps we’ll find that the Mandalorians we’ve seen are just a fraction of them all, that there are more offscreen, or that some of the ones we’ve seen are women and we just haven’t heard them speak. And it’s my understanding that there are more female characters coming soon. But this absence in representation is noticeable, especially given the franchise’s movement to better incorporate diversity overall and increase the number of prominent female characters within its stories in particular. Still, while this is disappointing and something that I certainly hope is corrected in future episodes, it’s an otherwise strong episodic narrative.

I’m happy that this show exists, and I want to see where it goes (and hope it fixes its representation issues), but more generally The Mandalorian has given me hope that we can see more live-action Star Wars stories in the future, and that they can continue to deliver quality story-telling while truly embracing the diversity of the human experience.

Gaining Focus: The Mandalorian 1.2

The second episode of The Mandalorian, titled “The Child,” was more focused than the first and benefited greatly from this. There are only a handful of characters with speaking lines, most of them indistinguishable Jawas, and of the three primary characters, one doesn’t talk at all. There was a good deal of action, which typically propelled the plot forward instead of feeling extraneous. And the story being told was simple enough: the Mandalorian needs to deliver his quarry. The Mandalorian’s ship has been stripped down by scavengers, and he needs to retrieve the parts. In fulfilling the objectives of recovering his parts and repairing his ship, he learns some pretty interesting things about his current “captive,” and he spends more time bonding with the gruff, wizened old Ugnaught pioneer, Kuiil.

Pedro Pascal is really managing to pull off a lot behind a helmet and full body armor. His character is gradually seeming like, well, a full character, instead of just a cardboard cutout of a gunslinger. We don’t know a lot yet, but he seems like a weird combination of violent and vulnerable. I still don’t know the character well enough, but at least the series seems committed to developing him. It’s Kuiil, played by Nick Nolte, who’s the truly engaging character so far. He’s incredibly resourceful, his past is more than a little bit intriguingly mysterious, and he also possesses a fair amount of compassion and wisdom. It’s too bad that it seems like the Mandalorian is leaving Kuiil behind on his journey, though they at least part on amicable terms.

The show is doing some interesting things with this bounty target. Things that I wouldn’t expect to happen so quickly. We might have some answers about the first-episode surprise coming at us quicker than I expected, answers that could have some wild and weird implications for the larger galaxy far, far away. Given that the first episode only came out earlier this same week, I don’t feel comfortable discussing this much further just yet. But suffice it to say, the show appears to be aiming at something more unique than episodic sequences of the Mandalorian Man With No Name snapping up quarry and shooting through obstacles. I think I’m now on board with this show–at least, I’m very eager to see what happens next!