Review: Amazing Dinoworld

Amazing Dinoworld is a tiny documentary miniseries released in 2019, currently available on a couple of the streaming platforms out there. I recently watched it and rather enjoyed it for its contemporary and impressively life-like depictions of dinosaurs.

Miniseries still manages to feel like an overstatement, as it’s just two episodes, each just under 50 minutes. It’s actually a little mystifying as to why it’s a two-parter instead of a single feature-length documentary film. It’s true that there’s a clear content split between the episodes, with the first focused on dinosaurs and the second on marine reptiles, but given that there are a couple of clear breaks in segments within each episode, it would have been quite easy to connect everything together.

Despite the brevity of the “season,” it covers an incredible amount of content. The first episode focuses on the impact of feathers on the continued evolution of dinosaurs and showcases a combination of scientific fact and speculation about what the adaptation of feathers might have allowed dinosaurs to do and become. Meanwhile, the second episode is largely about mosasaurs–their evolution, their ecology, and speculation about birthing and hunting strategies. A diverse, compelling, dynamic prehistoric world is depicted over the course of the two episodes.

In many ways, Amazing Dinoworld feels like a considerably updated spiritual successor to the Walking with Dinosaurs series, with really impressive reconstructions that combine live-action footage and computer-generated images. I thought it was great that Amazing Dinoworld‘s creators chose to focus mostly on lesser-known dinosaurs–although most would still be somewhat familiar to even the most casual fans of these creatures like myself. The first episode’s dinosaur protagonists are Deinocheirus in Mongolia and Troodon in the American arctic, with a supporting cast that includes Avimimus, Tarbosaurus, and Zanabazar for the former and Pachyrhinosaurus (with a speculatively thick and long keratinous horn over the flattened boss of the skull) and Nanuqsaurus for the latter. The second episode turns its attention to marine reptiles including Mosasaurus and Plesiosaurus; the large fish Xiphactinus; a pterosaur, Azhdarcho, and dinosaurs including Abelisaurus, a thoroughly modernized depiction of Spinosaurus, and two versions of the ever-popular Tyrannosaurus (one feathered like most of the dinosaur and pterosaur models in the show, one un-feathered for some reason).

There were some good interviews with paleontologists and depictions of fossil evidence, and there were a lot of fun speculative appearances and behaviors, but the show didn’t always make clear just how speculative some of it was. Furthermore, there was a generally oversimplified history of the developing theories about dinosaurs, their behaviors, and their evolution that made everything sound a bit newer in conception or less complicated than it actually was, but I suppose that’s the nature of a two-hour science documentary. Despite this, the overarching narration was helpful in describing what was happening on-screen and provided informative additional content, while the split between the life-like reconstructions of the prehistoric animals, interviews, and fossil depictions was fairly balanced.

The show was unfortunately still heavily male-dominated but was fairly international in its coverage of sites and scientists. However, it didn’t take long to recognize that a great deal of the scientists and filmmakers were Japanese. It appears that Amazing Dinoworld underwent a bit of an evolution of its own, as it was apparently originally released in 2018 as Dinosaur Superworld in Japan, if a couple of fan sites can be relied upon. That point is just a curiosity for me, not substantive; I don’t think I’ve seen a dinosaur documentary before that wasn’t produced by Americans or Brits.

Regardless of its origins, and in spite of its relative brevity, Amazing Dinoworld is easily one of the best documentaries about Mesozoic life that I’ve ever seen.