Review: Life Debt

Life Debt: Aftermath (Star Wars)Life Debt: Aftermath by Chuck Wendig

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Life Debt is a considerable improvement over the first book in the Aftermath trilogy. Wendig’s sharp wit, (mostly) vivid descriptions, colorful language, and diverting “Interlude” vignettes return. And now we also have pacing turned up to eleven, a more clearly defined plot with greater forward momentum, a sharper focus on the main characters, and much better characterization of those characters. Dialogue really sparkles here, and each character had a distinctive voice and attitude. Reading Life Debt felt a little bit like meeting up with old friends–remarkable given that I had just finished the first book a short while ago, I barely knew these characters, and I felt that they all blended together, at least in voice, in the first book.

For fans hoping to see more of the original film trilogy’s stars post-Endor, you’re in luck. Life Debt largely follows the Imperial-hunting crew from the first novel as they attempt to track down Han Solo at the direction of Leia. The book ultimately builds to Han’s attempt to liberate Kashyyyk from the brutal yoke of the Empire, while Leia attempts to motivate the New Republic senate to send aid to help out. While we still get the most time with the new crew of characters (and that’s a good thing–they’re fun!), we also get considerable swashbuckling action with Han and impassioned politicking with Leia. I’ve mentioned before that Wendig does a great job with Han, and that’s definitely the case here; Han’s a standout character. Supporting characters from the films, especially Wedge Antilles, Mon Mothma, and Admiral Ackbar, have plenty to do. And there’s a tense spy games thriller as a running subplot, with Grand Admiral Sloane becoming increasingly suspicious of her mysterious mentor Rax and attempting to uncover more about him.

The book ends in an intense Manchurian Candidate-style climax, mirroring that familiar Star Wars trope of a dark middle chapter in a trilogy. In the wake of the disaster, which is only slightly lessened by the quick actions of our heroes, the team is assigned to capture or kill Grand Admiral Sloane, allowing the book to end in a way that feels complete and yet provides a clear hook for the next installment.

I would strongly recommend this book. I would in fact recommend reading Life Debt even without reading Aftermath; the first book can be enjoyed as a prequel after the fact, if you’re so inclined, but it’s not vital to understanding the characters or events of this installment. Life Debt is a fun time and a cool development of the setting.

That said, I do have one strong reservation regarding my endorsement. One of the characters, Sinjir, is an ex-Imperial Loyalty Officer who used a variety of interrogation techniques to extract information, including torture. Over the course of the book, Sinjir is troubled because he still uses torture techniques to help out the New Republic. He’s worried he might even enjoy it. It could be an interesting insertion of moral nuance in the Star Wars setting; can doing the wrong things for the right reason ever be justified? Historically, that answer has been no, but Wendig seems to say, maybe? However, torture is not effective in extracting information. It’s cruel, and it will break people into saying whatever they think their torturers want to hear, but there’s no convincing evidence that torture actually works (debate on that subject can be found at https://www.pbs.org/newshour/show/tor… while a more direct rebuttal of the use of torture is at https://www.scientificamerican.com/ar…). And torture, physically and mentally tormenting someone, ranks up there as one of the most heinous acts that humans can commit! Star Wars films have actually consistently supported this view: the torture of Leia yields no information and the threat of destruction of her home planet results in her giving out a name of a target, though it’s not a useful name; the Cloud City torture of Han, Leia, and Chewbacca is merely meant to elicit a disturbance in the Force to prompt Luke to show up, even though no questions are asked and no information is gained; the torture room in Jabba’s palace is portrayed as a demented place of sadistic torment and severe punishment, not a place for actual information-gathering; and Poe resists traditional torture, only divulging information under Kylo Ren’s Force-backed techniques, while Rey doesn’t break at all. To the best of my recollection, heroes never torture while villains frequently do in the Star Wars films. Yet in Life Debt, the question is only whether torture can be used in a way that supports a greater moral good; torture, or the threat of torture, is something Sinjir jumps to quickly, and we are to believe that he has an exceptional ability to read people to determine if the information provided is useful. This is propaganda in support of tactics that are immoral, inhumane, and ineffective. It fits into a long line of action movie and TV propaganda in support of torture. The book has many strengths, but this element demands objection.

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Lost Stars

Lost StarsLost Stars by Claudia Gray

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Lost Stars is a lovely Star Wars novel. It’s obviously marketed as a young adult novel, with its flashy hardback cover design, stout layout, and large-font print, and that makes sense: it’s focused on the relationship between a young man and a young woman, starting when they are children. I admittedly have a bias against YA literature. But I enjoyed the book all the same; it was a good Star Wars novel not in spite of its centralized romantic focus, but because of it.

Over the course of the novel, we see Thane Kyrell and Ciena Ree bond over a love of flight, attend the Royal Academy for Imperial officer training on Coruscant, and eventually split apart as a result of the Galactic Civil War. Thane, disillusioned and cynical and anti-authoritarian, refuses to serve the Empire after seeing more and more of its atrocities; he eventually finds purpose by joining the Rebel Alliance, at first fighting against the Empire but later fighting for the values of the movement to restore the Republic. Ciena’s deep-seated loyalty and near-sacred emphasis on honor (traits carefully developed early on as distinctly part of her valley kindred culture) mean that she is unwilling to betray the Empire by leaving it even as she becomes increasingly disenchanted with it. But while they find themselves on opposing sides, and sometimes quite out of touch with what each other actually thinks, they still remain in love despite themselves.

Claudia Gray really sells the relationship. She obviously has a great ability to clearly convey how one feels. And this book revolves around emotions–not just love or loneliness, but anger and fear and passion and fanaticism, loss and sorrow, frustration, excitement, joy, and deep depression. All of the main cast of characters–largely consisting of people Ciena and Thane initially met in the Imperial Academy, but later bolstered by Thane’s friends from his free merchant days and his squad mates in the Rebellion–are portrayed as whole characters, and even though the plot remains narrowly focused on Ciena and Thane, we get glimpses of the others’ motivations and desires. (It’s pretty perfect that there’s a manga adaptation, given the relationship focus in a sci-fi setting in general and more specifically the military academy subplot for like a third of the book.)

Interestingly, we also get to hear a lot of rationalizations for why characters do what they do, why they make and break certain promises, why they believe in certain things. For Ciena and Thane, we see how their life experiences shape their thoughts and decisions. But for many other characters, there are intense political discussions to explain loyalty or disloyalty to the Empire. Ciena and her friends are able to accept the Death Star and its destruction of Alderaan using language reminiscent of those who defend the use of atomic bombs by the United States at the end of World War II. And even the second Death Star makes more sense here–while Ciena finally loses all faith in the Empire, her friends see it as necessary to finally break the fighting spirit of the Rebels. I think there’s an echo of the continued development and storage of ever-more-powerful nuclear weapons in the real world. There are even arguments about resisting the Empire versus attempting to change it from within, conversations that feel all-too-real. The Empire remains very evil, and those who stay with it are gradually corrupted by it, regardless of their intentions; what might that say about our nation’s own failures and about those who remain blindly patriotic to it?

In short, in addition to wonderfully developed relationships, this novel also delivers on some of the most explicitly political commentary in the new canon. While the Empire is evil and the Rebellion is good, there are a lot of gray area discussions and a lot of rationalizations for bad actions in good causes or good actions in bad causes. While the political commentary may be explicit, it’s explicitly about a fantasy universe, and the conventions of the Star Wars universe make it difficult to draw one-to-one comparisons to our sociopolitical reality. But it’s a book that rewards close attention, careful consideration, and interpretation.

It’s not just political commentary that rewards careful attention, though. Gray deploys foreshadowing in the early chapters that pays off rather well in the climactic conclusion. There are recurrent phrases or descriptions that reinforce theme. And there are many little nods to the larger Star Wars continuity.

Because of this, a minor flaw in the book bothered me just a little bit more. From time to time, small elements of continuity or terminology seemed to break down. (For one example, on page 334 we are told that Ciena remains aboard her Star Destroyer rather than going down to Cloud City, but on the following page, she’s suddenly moving through the city on a mission without any explanatory transition.) It’s possible that later printings or editions fix at least some of this, and it’s never a big deal, but it just distracts.

One other thing bothered me a little bit. Lost Stars reframes many events from the Original Trilogy and ties them into fallout from the Clone Wars as well as the events that would eventually lead to the Sequel Trilogy; this is often fun and rewarding. But it also gets a little too coincidental. There are just too many big moments from the films that these characters witness. They’re always on a particular deployment or taking part in the right service to be virtually everywhere: the destruction of Alderaan, the Dantooine base investigation and aftermath of the Death Star’s destruction, Hoth, Cloud City (where Ciena disables the Millennium Falcon‘s hyperdrive), Palpatine’s arrival on the second Death Star, the battle of Endor, and so on, including tie-ins to the new trilogy by way of the battle of Jakku. (And Ciena is part of the ploy that reveals to the Rebels that Palpatine will be heading to the second Death Star, while Thane is a fighter pilot spy who uncovers that intel.) Then there are all the character cameos, including Darth Vader, Grand Moff Tarkin, Admiral Piett, Admiral Ozzel, Princess Leia, Dak Ralter, Wedge Antilles, General Rieekan, Admiral Ackbar, Mon Mothma, General Madine, and Lando (plus references to characters like Luke and Han). The sheer enormity of direct references to the films gets a little bit old–but ties into the coincidental intersections that Ciena believes are due to the Force’s influence (thankfully, no major character has Force powers). If you can swallow all the crossovers, then you’ll enjoy the book even more than I did.

I should emphasize that I enjoyed this book a lot. It’s not perfect, but it’s beautiful and artful. It’s a favorite–though I already have so many favorites in the new Star Wars canon. There is room for a sequel based on the ending, and I hope that that sequel manifests. I’d encourage you to give it a try; even if it doesn’t seem like your cup of tea, you might be surprised.

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On The Front Lines: Extra Notes

In my review of Star Wars: On The Front Lines, I mostly talked about the narrative, but I really loved the art too. Writer Dan Wallace and artists Adrián Rodriguez, Thomas Wievegg, Aaron Riley, and Fares Maese (and of course the associated editorial/publishing team) produced an excellent product. The image at the top of this post is an example of some of that beautiful artwork; I’ll abstain from sharing any other images because you should check the book out for yourself.

If you haven’t looked through the book yet, though, you should probably stop reading here. While the book recounts major battles from the films and from The Clone Wars show, it does actually include a number of potential spoilers when it fleshes out additional details. And I want to talk about some of those details!

First, the level of diversity in these pages is great, with the focus on characters like Jedi Knight Bultar Swan, Jedi Master Mace Windu, Coruscant Home Fleet Commander Honor Salima (a woman of color and Republic officer who appears to have been invented for this book), Grand Moff Randd, and Resistance pilot Jess Pava. We also get a spotlight on a lot more aliens: Gungan General Ceel; separatists like Geonosian Archduke Poggle the Lesser, Kerkoiden General Whorm Loathsom, Techno Union Emir Wat Tambor, and cyborg General Grievous; Twi’lek freedom fighter Cham Syndulla and Twi’lek refugee Numa; Ewok chief Chirpa; Mon Cal Admirals Raddus and Ackbar; Sullustan smuggler Nien Nunb; Resistance pilot Ello Asty; and a new personal favorite of mine, Ranat commando Musmuris Reetgeet. With the addition of perspectives of droids and clones, this feels to me like a highlight of meaningful diversity in Star Wars, with diverse characters in diverse roles that don’t (to me, at least) come off as mere tokenism. This is truly a whole galaxy involved in war. Of course, there are plenty of perspectives from white characters, especially white men–and honestly, some of those perspectives are my favorite (I’ll touch on a couple examples later).

Okay, so the next thing I want to bring up is that it’s great to have Bultar Swan show up. Aside from her brief appearance in Episode II, I think this represents her first new canon appearance, and it confirms that she survived Geonosis! I’d like to see more stories with her. I’ve been somewhat fascinated by Bultar Swan ever since she showed up in the Wizards of the Coast Star Wars Roleplaying Game supplement, Power of the Jedi Sourcebook.

20171001_150537 Instead of just another background Jedi, she had a deeper story. I thought that was cool. Most of the alien Jedi in the Battle of Geonosis have gone on to have stories told about them. Not all of the humans have more than a name and likeness. I don’t think there were ever that many stories about Bultar Swan, but she’s basically a complete enigma in the new canon.

That’s all to say that the character remains rather intriguing to me because of the mysteriousness of her background. I’d enjoy seeing her explored more. The brief excerpt in On The Front Lines that is written from her perspective seems reflective of her older personality, but there’s plenty of room for this character to grow.

 

 

I liked the reexamination of more well-known characters, as well. For example: I’ve always had a soft spot for Rebel fighter ace and Rogue Squadron pilot Wedge Antilles, the man who survived both Death Stars, and reading the section in his perspective was brutal. Wedge reflects,

I survived the Battle of Yavin, and for a long time, a part of me wished I hadn’t.

. . .

When a laser blast from one of [the TIEs] melted my micromaneuvering controls, I was done. I couldn’t continue the run. I had to get out of the trench. If I had stayed, I would have fishtailed into Biggs and taken us both out.

I apologized over the comm and pulled out of the trench. For just a moment I felt my fear turn into relief. That’s the moment I always think about. That’s the moment that hardened into guilt.

Poor Wedge! What a real emotion, what a sincere experience in this fantasy galaxy. And I think it gives Wedge a clearly defined narrative arc in the films, one that would not otherwise be there (at least explicitly). Wedge keeps trying to make up for that moment, and maybe he finally does when he helps to take down the second Death Star. At least, I sure hope he found some peace of mind in doing so (here I am, talking about this fictional character like he’s a real person–what can I say, the writing here worked really well).

And Nien Nunb, who got to have more of an interesting story and personality in the new canon’s Princess Leia comic, has a pretty funny and sassy section in which he cheers the superiority of smugglers in the Rebellion.

One character revision that certainly stood out to me, though I didn’t necessarily like it, involves Hobbie Klivian (the image at the top is from this section). As you may know, in the novelization of The Empire Strikes Back, Hobbie is dying in a crippled snowspeeder and directs it into General Veers’s AT-AT, apparently killing them both. The novelization concludes the scene as follows, from the perspective of General Veers:

At that instant, Hobbie’s burning ship crashed through the walker cockpit like a manned bomb, its fuel igniting into a cascade of flame and debris. For a second there were human screams, then fragments, and the entire machine crashed to the ground.

This death scene does not appear in the film. It could not happen offscreen exactly as written, either. In the novelization, Hobbie appears to interrupt Veers’s attack on the shield generator. But in the film, Veers survives at least long enough to personally destroy the shield generator.

In the old canon, a version of the crash did occur. In this version, Hobbie and his gunner ejected in time, and he went on to become an important figure in the X-Wing franchise of comics and novels (confession: as beloved by fans as the series is, I never read the books and only saw maybe a couple issues of the comics). Veers, meanwhile, was left disabled by the attack, although he continued to serve in the military as well.

Hobbie’s kamikaze death has been restored–and there’s no way he got pulled from the wreckage this time. The first sentence of Hobbie’s section notes his “heroic death.”

What I’m worried about now is the fate of General Veers. Apparently Hobbie crashed into Blizzard One, the lead AT-AT, just as in the old canon. As I’ve previously mentioned, General Veers is my favorite Imperial of the films and one of the few Imperial officers who is actually competent. Dan Wallace recognizes this competence, writing of Veers that he was a “brilliant tactician” whom “Darth Vader respected . . . for his eerily calm demeanor under fire.” I saw nothing definitive about what happened to Veers in the book. It certainly seems likely that he is dead. But he could have survived, evacuating the AT-AT in time. Maybe he was badly injured in this new canon version and will once again return to active military service. I hope so. It’s always more interesting when the Rebellion actually has a challenging and recurring foe. And I suppose I don’t love the idea of Veers dying in a nearly identical way to Piett, killed by a damaged kamikaze craft when his forces are overextended.

At this point, I could go on and on, but I’ve covered the things that most fascinated me about the book (though I have to name-drop Musmuris Reetgeet again, because he’s a cool guy). It’s a great Star Wars reference book, and it’s also a lovely art book. I hope there are more guides like this released for the new canon!